social exclusion

In June 2008, the Child Poverty Unit held an event entitled ’Ending Child Poverty: “Thinking 2020”’ at which around 100 stakeholders from across lobby organisations, academic institutions, devolved administrations and local and central Government attended. The event was designed to begin a discussion with stakeholders on the vision for a UK free of child poverty by 2020, and the route by which that could be achieved.

Moraene (Mo) Roberts has worked with the charity ATD Fourth World for many years and has worked with many families in poverty. Her experiences and insights into the issues of poverty and social exclusion provides a very useful overview of the issues facing families living in poverty and some key lessons for practitioners who are in contact with these families. The interview lasts approximately 20 minutes.

This resource is a practical tool for learning disability partnership boards and others working to support older family carers and their relative with a learning disability – referred to here as older families – to bring about positive changes in their lives. It should enable boards to measure what they are doing, how well they are doing it and to decide what they need to do next.

This factsheet discusses drug use and HIV stigma and highlights that drug use is a powerful source of stigma and discrimination. People who have aquired HIV through injecting drug use face a double stigma.

This guide is about the rights and entitlements of separated refugee and asylum-seeking children in England (often described as unaccompanied children). These are children under 18 years of age who are outside their country and separated from both parents or their legal/customary primary care-giver. The majority of separated children come to the UK alone. However, some children become separated in the UK after informal foster arrangements or family break down.

Report describing the activities, resources and views of the AGE/inc Project, an EU-wide organisation committed to bettering the quality of life for older people through changing attitudes to them and persuading decision makers to increase resources allotted to them.

In this learning object you are asked to consider issues which are central to understanding the experience of ageing and older age in contemporary society. Ageism, age discrimination and social exclusion diminish the quality of life which older people may enjoy. They also threaten their mental health. In spite of their negative effect on the daily lives of older people, however, ageism and age discrimination are often unrecognised, ignored, or even compounded in health and social care settings.

It is now increasingly understood that there are different types of knowledge, all of which contribute to the ability of members of the children's workforce to do their jobs well. Understanding the types of knowledge that are available, and having access to this knowledge is an important aspect for anybody who is working with families that are living in poverty.

Research briefing paper looking at the experiences of children and young people under 18 years caring for a parent or parents with mental health problems defined as 'serious' or 'severe' and 'enduring'.

This report was produced in 2002 by the Chapin Hall Center for Children, based at the University of Chicago. It provides data on patterns of employment and the levels of earnings of youths leaving foster care in the year they become eighteen. The study was concentrated on youth from Carolina and Illinois. Comparisons are made with other youths of similar age from low income families and with those who are reunited with their parents before they are eighteen.