social exclusion

In April 2004 the Office of Health Economics and the Mental Health Foundation held a seminar focusing on the economics of childhood and adolescent mental health as part of their commitment to improving mental health provision for children and young people in the UK. This report is an attempt to draw together the themes from the discussions, along with general conclusions from the day.

Despite poverty and social exclusion being common characteristics of families involved in the child protection system and a key factor associated with children becoming looked after, there is evidence to suggest that professionals struggle to truly incorporate an understanding of the impact of poverty in their assessments and interventions. In practice social workers and other professionals continue to have difficulty in making sense of the complex interplay between poverty, social deprivation, parental capacity and children's development.

This short film on stigma and mental illness was developed for the Royal College of Psychiatrists' Changing Minds campaign, to be shown in the cinema to coincide with World Mental Health Day 2000. Aimed mainly at young adults aged 15 to 25, it aims to challenge preconceptions about mental health, and touches on anorexia, drug addiction, depression and dementia. It is rated Certificate 15.

The purpose of the Scottish Legal Action Group is to promote equal access to justice in Scotland. Accordingly, the Group seeks to improve and advance Scots law for the benefit of those members of society who are economically, socially, or otherwise disadvantaged.

Report building on research into the causes and consequences of social exclusion and complex needs and concluding that, as these can vary by age group and region, identifying and understanding these characteristics can help services be better targeted.

Report examining the system of funding for schools in England. It concludes the system should be reformed and recommends part of the reform should be the introduction of a premium for pupils from more disadvantaged backgrounds. It argues a pupil premium would enable schools to plan their budgets around their admissions and fund programmes to improve educational attainment.

This web page by Deborah Kaplan, Director of the World Institute on Disability, discusses different ways of defining 'disability' and looks at the complex ways that persons with disabilities perceive themselves and their changing status in society. For models for defining disability are discussed in detail: the moral, medical, rehabilitation, and disability models. References and web links are given.

This report uses data from the Growing up in Scotland (GUS) study to explore the contribution of specific measures of advantage and disadvantage in relation to a number of specific health related behaviours for parent and child and, in doing so, seeks to identify the characteristics of more vulnerable and more resilient families. Findings are based on the first sweep of GUS, which involved interviews with the main carers of 5,217 children aged 0-1 years old and 2,859 children aged 2-3 years old, carried out between April 2005 and March 2006.

Providing suitable and sustainable accommodation for children and young people who have offended or are at risk of offending is critical to both social inclusion and reducing re-offending. This strategy aims to develop work with national, regional and local partners to prevent homelessness among young people who have offended or who are at risk of offending, and to increase their access to suitable and sustainable accommodation.

The guide is based on practical experience. It provides tried and tested methods of working, for adults interested in encouraging young people to become actively involved in their local community and its regeneration. This guide is based on the experience and learning from Save the Children’s Community Partners Programme (2000 to 2005).