children in need

The government has high-profile child poverty targets which are assessed using a measure of income, as recorded in the Household Below Average Income series (HBAI).

However, income is an imperfect measure of living standards. Previous analysis suggests that some children in households with low income do not have commensurately low living standards.

This report aims to document the extent to which this is true, focusing on whether children in low-income households have different living standards depending on whether their parents are employed, self-employed, or workless.

A research report identifying interventions that appeared to make the most differences in terms of both the educational experience and the educational outcomes of the looked after children and young people participating in the pilot projects.

The report was produced by Strathclyde University and published by the Scottish Government.

Ministers asked the Take Up Taskforce to develop ways to help local services to support parents to access all their relevant benefit entitlements, in order to help tackle child poverty.

Many poor families are not taking up all of the financial support to which they are entitled and there are particularly low rates of take up by families where at least one parent is working. Lack of awareness of available in-work financial entitlements can present a barrier to parents entering and sustaining work.

This review is part of the government's response to the recommendations of the Hammond Report following the tragic death of a 3-year-old child, Kennedy McFarlane. The aim of the review is to promote the reduction of abuse or neglect of children, and to improve the services for children who experience abuse or neglect.

Despite tough times ahead, there is still political consensus around the goal to end child poverty. Based on new projections taking account of the recession, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation has updated its assessment of what it will take to meet the government targets to halve child poverty by 2010 and eradicate it by 2020.

Foster children have difficult early lives. Their needs are great, their educational performance can be poor, their childhoods in foster care and out of it are often unstable. In their adult lives they are at greater risk than others of a wide variety of difficulties. These 'facts' have led some to conclude that the state is not an adequate parent.

This review examines the education of children in need. It discusses the education of children looked after by local authorities; the impact of the Children Act 1989; the education of children out of school and the way these issues can be addressed.

This research project was commissioned by the Scottish Executive to find out how advocacy for children in the Children’s Hearings System compares with arrangements in other UK systems of child welfare and youth justice and those internationally, and what children and young people and the professionals who work with them think about advocacy arrangements in the Children’s Hearings System and how these can be improved.

The manifesto sets out a plan of action based on the findings of The Good Childhood Inquiry®, ‘A Good Childhood: Searching for Values in a Competitive Age’, which stimulated a major national debate about how the nation treats its young people. The manifesto identifies three key areas in which political leaders must act to improve childhood now and for future generations, and calls for every political party to write these pledges into their manifestos.