children in need

Ministers asked the Take Up Taskforce to develop ways to help local services to support parents to access all their relevant benefit entitlements, in order to help tackle child poverty.

Many poor families are not taking up all of the financial support to which they are entitled and there are particularly low rates of take up by families where at least one parent is working. Lack of awareness of available in-work financial entitlements can present a barrier to parents entering and sustaining work.

This review is part of the government's response to the recommendations of the Hammond Report following the tragic death of a 3-year-old child, Kennedy McFarlane. The aim of the review is to promote the reduction of abuse or neglect of children, and to improve the services for children who experience abuse or neglect.

Despite tough times ahead, there is still political consensus around the goal to end child poverty. Based on new projections taking account of the recession, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation has updated its assessment of what it will take to meet the government targets to halve child poverty by 2010 and eradicate it by 2020.

Foster children have difficult early lives. Their needs are great, their educational performance can be poor, their childhoods in foster care and out of it are often unstable. In their adult lives they are at greater risk than others of a wide variety of difficulties. These 'facts' have led some to conclude that the state is not an adequate parent.

This review examines the education of children in need. It discusses the education of children looked after by local authorities; the impact of the Children Act 1989; the education of children out of school and the way these issues can be addressed.

This research project was commissioned by the Scottish Executive to find out how advocacy for children in the Children’s Hearings System compares with arrangements in other UK systems of child welfare and youth justice and those internationally, and what children and young people and the professionals who work with them think about advocacy arrangements in the Children’s Hearings System and how these can be improved.

The manifesto sets out a plan of action based on the findings of The Good Childhood Inquiry®, ‘A Good Childhood: Searching for Values in a Competitive Age’, which stimulated a major national debate about how the nation treats its young people. The manifesto identifies three key areas in which political leaders must act to improve childhood now and for future generations, and calls for every political party to write these pledges into their manifestos.

Child wellbeing and child poverty:where the UK stands in the European table, is a briefing paper of research by a York University team for the Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) published in April 2009. This league table of young people's wellbeing places the United Kingdom 24th out of 29 countries measured across seven areas: health, education, housing, material resources, relationships, risk, and how young people feel about their lives. The data was mostly drawn from 2006 and does not reflect changes as a result of government programmes since that time.

The response is presented of Scottish ministers and the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (COSLA) to the recommendations put forward by the Securing Our Future Initiative into how to make best use of Scotland’s secure care resources to improve outcomes for young people and their communities.

They welcome the group’s report and strongly endorse the principles outlined in the vision. They accept in full the nine recommendations of Securing Our Future Initiative and believe that the recommendations should be implemented as an integrated package.