low income

Consultation response: 'Ending child poverty: Making it happen'

Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) response to the Department for Children, Schools and Families consultation 'Ending child poverty: Making it happen'.

Time and income poverty (summary report)

Time and money are two key constraints on what people can achieve. The income constraint is widely recognised by policy-makers and social scientists in their concern with poverty. Proposed solutions often focus on getting people into paid work, but this risks ignoring the demands people may have on their time. This study looks at individuals who are significantly limited by time and income constraints: those who could escape income poverty only by incurring time poverty, or vice versa.

The GDP cost of the lost earning potential of adults who grew up in poverty

The impact on earnings and employment of growing up in poverty. This report estimates the costs of child poverty in terms of reduced GDP, focusing on the lost earning potential of adults who have grown up in poverty.

Is a not-for-profit home credit business feasible?

The seizing up of wholesale markets, combined with tightened lending criteria, has created a credit supply crisis among vulnerable borrowers, many of whom rely on home credit. Commercial home credit is long-established, with large numbers of low-income customers. It has many features that are valued by its customers, but the cost is high. This report addresses the essential elements of a not-for-profit service as identified by customers and lenders.

Joseph Rowntree Foundation Lecture - Basic income and social justice: Why philosophers disagree

This lecture was presented by Philippe van Parijs from the Universite Catholique de Louvain, Belgium, with a response from Sir Tony Atkinson, Nuffield College, Oxford. In this lecture, he argues for the introduction of a basic income unconditionally paid to all.

The living standards of families with children reporting low incomes

The government has high-profile child poverty targets which are assessed using a measure of income, as recorded in the Household Below Average Income series (HBAI).

However, income is an imperfect measure of living standards. Previous analysis suggests that some children in households with low income do not have commensurately low living standards.

This report aims to document the extent to which this is true, focusing on whether children in low-income households have different living standards depending on whether their parents are employed, self-employed, or workless.

Ending child poverty in a changing economy (summary report)

Despite tough times ahead, there is still political consensus around the goal to end child poverty. Based on new projections taking account of the recession, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation has updated its assessment of what it will take to meet the government targets to halve child poverty by 2010 and eradicate it by 2020.

A minimum income standard for Britain in 2009

In 2008, JRF published the first ‘minimum income standard for Britain’, based on what members of the public thought people need to achieve a socially acceptable standard of living. A year later, and in changing economic circumstances, the standard has been updated for inflation. This study updates 2008’s innovative research, based on what members of the public thought people need for an acceptable minimum standard of living.

Cycles of poverty, unemployment and low pay

Household incomes are dynamic and families can move in and out of poverty over time, with some of them becoming trapped in a cycle. What causes this kind of ‘recurrent’ poverty and how does it relate to unemployment and low pay? How could these cycles be broken? This report summarises the findings of four projects about recurrent poverty and the low-pay/no-pay cycle and examines relevant current UK policy and practice and suggests ways to create longer-lasting routes out of poverty.

How can parents escape from recurrent poverty?

This report details the reasons behind the low-pay/no-pay cycle and recurrent poverty among disadvantaged parents. The report uses qualitative interviews and focus groups with parents and practitioners, and survey analysis.