document

This strategy sets out the Scottish Government’s expectations of further developments in telecare: telecare to contribute significantly to the achievement of personalised health and social care outcomes for individuals; telecare to contribute significantly to delivering wider national benefits in areas such as shifting the balance of care and the management of long-term health conditions; and local partnerships to mainstream telecare within local service planning.

‘Commissioning’ is a word that is increasingly heard by those who work with children, young people and their families. This publication has been written specifically for community organisations to help them understand commissioning and seize the opportunities that this process affords. These include the opportunity to use their local knowledge to shape services for children and young people, as well as being funded to deliver those services.

This document sets out the rationale for integrated care and its wider context. It provides definitions and concepts of integrated care and its key elements: accessibility, assessment, planning and delivery of care, information sharing, monitoring and evaluation. Evidence is also provided from research literature, focus groups and consultation on the key issues that influence effective practice in integrated care. Key principles and elements of effective practice drawn from the evidence are also explained.

In 2001 the Scottish Executive Education Department (SEED) commissioned Professor Colwyn Trevarthen and a team of colleagues to review the research evidence on the development of children from birth to three years old, and to consider the implications of that evidence for the provision of care outwith the home.

Report providing an understanding of the context for geographically focused community regeneration activity in Scotland, assessing the impacts of previous community regeneration interventions and sketching out the challenges for policy makers in developing effective community regeneration approaches in the future.

To coincide with the publication of Lord Laming's report into the death of Victoria Climbie, NCH sets out our views on child protection and the future for children's services in England. NCH believes we must examine the whole range of children's services, not just the child protection system on its own because it does not exist in isolation in the real world.

This document examines the Court of Protection's health and welfare jurisdiction under the Mental Capacity Act 2005. The new powers enable the court to make orders in relation to not only property and affairs but also personal welfare.

This report summarises the findings of the Final Evaluation of the Working for Families Fund (WFF). WFF, which operated from 2004-08, invested in initiatives to remove childcare barriers and improve the employability of disadvantaged parents who have barriers to participating in the labour market, specifically to help them move towards, into, or continue in employment, education or training. The programme was administered by 20 local authorities (which covered 79% of Scotland’s population), operating through around 226 locally based public, private and third-sector projects.

Consultation document intended to provoke debate and discussion over the UK Government's proposals for the future of the asylum and immigration system in the UK.

This document comprises two separate reports on research undertaken in 2008/09 on the Pensions Education Fund (PEF). Part 1 is on the costs associated with the delivery of the main outputs associated with PEF, such as workplace seminars, by Risk Solutions, and Part 2 on the role and activities of pensions information intermediaries (or pensions ‘champions’) in the workplace, by IFF Ltd.