challenging behaviour

×

Error message

  • The file could not be created.
  • The file could not be created.

Tackling antisocial behaviour in Scotland: An action framework for social housing practitioners and governing bodies

Tackling antisocial behaviour is a key activity for housing organisations across the UK. This ‘action framework’ focuses specifically on Scottish policy and practice. It uses a systematic process approach towards tackling antisocial behaviour organised in seven photocopiable core tasks. Designed to develop staff awareness, and strategic planning and monitoring, it can also form the basis of in-house training programmes.

The same as you?: a review of services for people with learning disabilities

This review of services for people with learning disabilities began by looking at services, especially in social and healthcare, and their relationship with education, housing, employment and other areas. It also focused on people’s lifestyles and wider policies including social inclusion, equality and fairness, and the opportunity for people to improve themselves through continuous learning. The review also recommends that for all but a few people, health and social care should be provided in their own homes or in community settings alongside the rest of the population.

Caring for someone with dementia: hobbies, pastimes and everyday activities

The Alzheimer’s Society is the UK’s leading care and research charity for people with dementia, their families and carers. They produce information and advice sheets to support those affected by dementia. This factsheet offers ideas and suggestions of activities for people with dementia to enjoy which can improve their quality of life and the life of their carers.

Support and services for parents: a review of practice development in Scotland

Scottish Government evaluation of how Parenting Orders have been used by local authorities and Community Health Partnerships.

The Antisocial Behaviour etc. (Scotland) Act 2004 introduced Parenting Orders as part of a three-year pilot scheme. Parenting Orders introduced, for the first time, the potential for compulsory measures over parents and were designed to support those who refused to engage with voluntary support services to improve their parenting where this was considered seriously deficient.