art therapy

Skills for Care in partnership with Skills for Care and Development (SfCD) and Creative & Cultural Skills (CCS) commissioned Consilium Research and Consultancy to undertake an evidence review and activity mapping study to inform future thinking around the role of arts in the delivery of adult social care and in particular the implications for workforce development:

Isabel McCue was inspired to set up Theatre Nemo following her son John's eight year battle with mental ill-health. Its mission is to empower people affected by mental ill-health to have better, more fulfilled lives through the creative arts. 

The organisation runs projects in communities, prisons and hospitals.

Arts agency providing a platform for artists who find it difficult to access the art world either because of mental health issues, disability, health or social circumstance.

Gardening Leave was set up in 2007 as a horticultural therapy pilot project to enhance the therapeutic experience of ex-military personnel with combat related mental health problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the Gardening Leave pilot project as a therapeutic intervention for ex-military personnel with combat related mental health problems from the point of view of the veterans who use the service and clinical staff who work with them at the Combat Stress treatment centre.

A resource for professionals working with sexually abused children and young people that contains a collection of stories, poetry and pictures by a group of young people who met through an NSPCC service, which helped them come to terms with the experience of sexual abuse.

This guide has been reduced to help people involved in putting the NICE guideline on schizophrenia into practice. It highlights a selection of resources available from NICE, government and other organisations. These resources are intended to provide an overview of information directly related to the guideline, not an exhaustive list. It should be noted that many of the documents and resources listed were published before the NICE guideline on schizophrenia.

The aims of this study are: to systematically identify existing published research on singing, wellbeing and health; to map this research in terms of the forms of singing investigated, designs and methods employed and participants involved: to critically appraise this body of research, and where possible synthesise findings to draw general conclusions about the possible benefits of singing for health. The hypothesis underpinning this review is that singing, and particularly group singing, has a positive impact on personal wellbeing and physical health.