listening skills

This report summarises the findings of the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) Listening Exercise, which took place between February and July 2002. SCIE is an independent organisation created in response to the government drive to improve quality in social care services across England and Wales. It was launched in October 2001. As SCIE is a new organisation, it was considered appropriate during its first year to carry out a special Listening Exercise project.

Listening to children is an integral part of understanding what they are feeling and what it is they need from their early years experience. Understanding listening in this way is key to providing an environment in which all children feel confident, safe and powerful, ensuring they have the time and space to express themselves in whatever form suits them. This resource refers to listeners as adults and looks specifically at listening to babies.

Report of an evaluation of the Young Children’s Voices Network (YCVN), a project, begun in 2006, which focuses on participation in the early years. The purpose of the evaluation was to analyse the nature of YCVNs and discover what has helped and hampered local authorities in developing both their network and a culture of listening.

This resource examines the reasons for listening to children which includes that it acknowledges their right to be listened to and for their views and experiences to be taken seriously about matters that affect them. Listening can make a difference to our understanding of children’s priorities, interests and concerns and can make a difference to our understanding of how children feel about themselves. This resource highlights that listening is a vital part of establishing respectful relationships with the children we work with and that it is central to the learning process.

Paper looking at the types of conversations which take place between doctors and patients, particularly concerning diabetes and mental illness. It concludes that doctors are learning to talk and listen to ever more assertive patients and that improving the quality of conversations is vital to empowerment and innovation.

Resource that highlights how listening to children is an integral part of understanding what they are feeling and is key to helping children to make sense of differences.

Guide produced to help health and social care organisations become better at listening, responding and learning from people's experiences of care through improving feedback and complaints procedures.

This resource is an introduction to the differences between adult and children’s communication. This is a mixture of small group discussion and tutor-led information giving, supported by handouts.

This resource discusses the benefits of being listened to as a child and how what we learn about ourselves from the adults closest to us depends on the quality of our experience with them. This in turn affects how our self-esteem and sense of identity develops.