foster children

Aberdeenshire Council social work service helps families care for their children at home. However, for a variety of reasons this is not always possible.

This review sets out to investigate the evidence base for the provision of differentiated services to meet the diverse needs of disabled children and young people and their families. It focuses on children from BME (black and minority ethnic) communities, children with complex needs, children living away from home, and children from refugee and asylum-seeking families as instances of those who face the most challenges to adequate service delivery.

Workbook containing standards and other materials intended to assist new foster carers to reach a certain level of competence within their first two years of fostering.

Report inquiring into the age range of the foster care workforce in the UK to try to establish whether there are any immediate concerns for the future provision of foster care.

This document includes the draft Looked After Children (Scotland) Regulations 2008 and accompanying consultation document. It sets out the policy behind the draft Regulations and sought comments on a number of issues within the Regulations. The consultation period ran from 5 December 2007 to 14 March 2008.

Scottish Government report on what needs to be in place to provide a truly child-centred response and approach to the provision of foster and kinship care.

It then considers what improvements are needed in the support provided to carers that will in turn enhance the quality of care provided to children.

Finally, it addresses the improvements that can be made to the quality assurance systems that govern these types of care.

These standards were developed to improve the quality of care and service for those in foster care. The standards cover the following activities: recruiting, selecting, approving, training and supporting foster carers; matching children and young people with foster carers; supporting and monitoring foster carers; and the work of agency fostering panels and other approval panels. The standards do not apply to the services provided directly by foster carers themselves.

Despite reduced placements of children in family based and institutional care, the Department of Human Resources has seen increased foster care expenditures rather than substantial savings. The difference between potential savings and actual costs is $35 million. There are no clear reasons for why this happened.

For a variety of reasons, some children and young people can’t live with their parents. When parents aren’t able to look after a child, the local authority has a legal responsibility to do so. It will find somewhere for the young person to live and someone to look after them. When this happens, the child is said to be “in care” or being “looked after”.