detention and training orders

Home Detention Curfew (HDC) and open prison are both forms of ‘conditional liberty’, where prisoners are allowed controlled access to the community. Schemes of conditional liberty are intended to provide a gradual transition from prison to community thus facilitating a person’s reintegration. On an HDC licence, prisoners live at home but must wear an electronically monitored tag and keep to a curfew; in open prison, prisoners live at the prison but can be granted home leave and participate in activities that prepare them for release.

In October 2010, the Cabinet Secretary for Justice, Kenny MacAskill MSP, decided that it was necessary to review key elements of Scottish criminal law and practice in the light of the decision of the United Kingdom Supreme Court in Cadder

This research investigates the experiences of UK immigration detention of children1 and their families. Numerous research studies (Crawley and Lester, 2005; Lorek et al, 2009; Burnett et al, 2010) and inspection reports (Aynsley-Green, 2005; HMIP, 2008; 2010) have highlighted that the experience of detention, even for a relatively brief period of time, has a detrimental effect on the mental and physical health of children.

Statistical bulletin which presents national level information on activity relating to community penalties in Scotland, derived from Local Authority Social Work management information systems.

It provides information on various aspects of criminal justice social work such as Social Enquiry Reports (SERs), Community Service Orders (CSOs), Probation Orders (POs), Supervised Attendance Orders (SAOs) and Drug Treatment and Testing Orders (DTTOs).

The Conservative-Liberal Democrat Government Coalition Agreement of 10th May 2010 included a commitment to “end the detention of children for immigration purposes”. On 25th May it was announced that a review of existing practice in the UK and elsewhere would be undertaken in order to identify how this commitment would be achieved. The terms of reference for the review were published on the UK Border Agency (UKBA) website on 11th June and debated in the House of Commons on 17th June.

The report evaluates the range and effectiveness of the arrangements for education and training for several categories of young people: those identified for their likelihood of offending; young offenders who move into custodial establishments then are transferred between different establishments while in custody; and those who move between custody and the community. The report illustrates good practice and makes recommendations for improvement.

Summary presenting some of the key themes running through the responses to the Scottish Government's proposals for reforming the children's hearings system and giving an overview of the levels of support for the proposals.

Report of a House of Commons inquiry into the detention of children in the UK immigration system. It looked at why children were detained, how long they were detained for and the conditions inside Yarl's Wood Immigration Removal Centre, Bedfordshire. It concludes that improvements need to be made to the legal process, the processing of asylum claims and the treatment of detainees pending legal decisions.