child neglect

This information resource sets out guidelines about Disabled children and how vulnerable to abuse or neglect than non-disabled children. It is intended to help those with a strategic or planning responsibility for children understand their particular needs and consider how best to safeguard and promote their welfare.

This project explored parents’ experiences of situations where concerns of Non-Accidental Injury (NAI) were raised and how they remembered and reflected on these. It also investigated increasing the awareness of paediatricians and other health professionals of what is perceived as helpful or less helpful from the parents' perspective, and making suggestions for paediatric training to improve communication.

The Protection of Children in England: A Progress Report, by Lord Laming, was published in March 2009 as HC 330. It was commissioned by the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families following the death of "Baby P". "This document, and its recommendations, are aimed at making sure that good practice becomes standard practice in every service. This includes recommendations on improving the inspection of safeguarding services and the quality of Serious Case Reviews as well as recommendations on improving the help and support children receive when they are at risk of harm.

This study is one of a series of projects, jointly commissioned by the DCSF and the Department of Health, to improve the evidence base on recognition, effective intervention and inter-agency working in child abuse and focuses on recognition of neglect. This literature review aimed to provide a synthesis of the existing empirical evidence about the ways in which children and families signal their need for help, how those signals are recognised and responded to and whether response could be swifter.

Factsheet which gives a definition of child abuse and describes how criminal investigations are undertaken. It also explains why it is sometimes decided not to prosecute in cases in child abuse.

Scottish Executive consultation on a draft Bill intended to support the implementation of Getting it right for every child, the reform programme for children's services.

The bill would place duties on agencies to promote the well-being of children and to work together. Also included in the bill are measures to ensure that the views of children are taken into account. Grounds for referral to the Children's Hearings system would also change if the bill were passed as legislation.

Hidden Lives Revealed focuses on the period 1881-1918, and includes unique archive material about poor and disadvantaged children cared for by The Waifs and Strays' Society. The Society cared for children across England and Wales - in both the densest urban conurbations and some of the smallest rural villages. The Waifs and Strays' Society looked after about 22,500 children between its foundation in 1881 and the end of World War One. The Waifs and Strays' Society became the Church of England Children's Society in 1946 and is now known as The Children's Society.

This study is one of a series of projects, jointly commissioned by the DCSF and the Department of Health, to improve the evidence base on recognition, effective intervention and inter-agency working in child abuse and focuses on recognition of neglect.

This literature review aimed to provide a synthesis of the existing empirical evidence about the ways in which children and families signal their need for help, how those signals are recognised and responded to and whether response could be swifter.

Presents new evidence on the damaging effects of neglect and the challenges of dealing with the issue, as told by the professionals in a position to spot the early warning signs – before more serious concerns are reported to the police or social workers. It paints a worrying picture from the frontline of the signs and consequences of child neglect as seen in nurseries, primary schools, hospitals and in local communities across the UK.