briefing paper

Mental health, recovery and employment

This is the fifth in a series of discussion papers designed to help generate debate on how best to promote and support recovery from long-term mental health problems in Scotland. This paper is not a review of the literature, but aims to encourage discussion and action around supporting people with long-term mental health problems to gain and sustain suitable employment, which in 'the mental health world' should go hand in hand with the development of recovery orientated services.

Throughcare and aftercare provided for children and young people in residential care : are services meeting the standards? (The Care Commission bulletin)

Bulletin looking at the quality of throughcare and aftercare services in place for children and young people looked after away from home in residential services in Scotland and how these can be improved.

Recovery Management

This resource contains a synthesis of findings from scientific studies and recommendations from new grassroots recovery advocacy and support organisations that are collectively pushing a fundamental redesign of addiction treatment in the United States. This resource introduces a recovery management model through a collection of four papers.

Multi-agency protection arrangements (MAPPA) in Scotland: what do the numbers tell us?

Briefing paper that collates for the first time, statistics about multi-agency public protection arrangements (MAPPA) across Scotland. The paper begins by outlining the MAPPA arrangements in Scotland and compares information about offenders managed through MAPPA in Scotland with those in England and Wales. It then offers a detailed examination of the data available about MAPPA in Scotland.

Expectations and aspirations: public attitudes towards social care

This briefing is the first output from the ippr-PwC social care programme. This programme seeks to generate public debate about the future of social care; and consider how the social contract between the state, organisations, communities, families and individuals may need to fundamentally change to ensure that the future of social care is based on principles of fairness and sustainability. This publication it's free, in order to download there are two ways to do it, by registering or just by following the link to download it.

Social networks and Polish immigration to the UK

This working paper forms part of the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) Economics of Migration project. It looks at how Polish migrants have increasingly used social networks to find employment in the UK. Although this has allowed them to maintain high employment rates it brings a risk that migrants will be "locked in" to low-skilled jobs and less integrated into the wider economy and society. The integration policy agenda is currently focused on long term settlement but many migrants only come to the UK for a short period of time.