article

Article that asks why bureaucracy is derailing personalisation and what can be done to rescue the policy.

Discussion paper on why the underpinning notion of self directed support seems to have failed in its ambitions. It also looks at how the concepts of personalisation and personal budgets associated with self-directed support may retain value if interpreted in an appropriate way, delivered through an appropriate strategy.

Social enterprise, characterised by organisations enacting a hybrid mix of non-profit and for-profit characteristics, is increasingly regarded as an important component in the regeneration of areas affected by social and economic deprivation. In parallel there has been growing academic, practitioner and policy interest in 'social value' and 'social impact' within the broader 'social economy'.

Little research has been done into what social workers do in everyday child protection practice. This paper outlines the broad findings from an ethnographic study of face-to-face encounters between social workers, children and families, especially on home visits.

Public participation in planning and implementing health care has become a government mandate in many states. In UK mental health services, this 'user involvement' policy dates back nearly three decades and has now become enshrined in policy. However, an implementation gap in terms of achieving meaningful involvement and influence for service users persists.

Resource allocation systems based upon measures of need are one widely adopted approach to estimating the cost of the individual service user’s care package in a manner directly proportionate to individual need. 

However, some recent studies have questioned the feasibility and utility of such systems, arguing that the relationship between needs and costs cannot be modelled with sufficient accuracy to provide a useful guide to individual allocation. In contrast, this paper presents three studies demonstrating that this is possible.

This is an article from the New Yorker that looks at innovation and creativity in the context of the development of computers and printers.  

Weiss suggests 7 ways in which social science research is used in policy making.

This article covers some of the different approaches to policy evaluation. It considers some of the barriers to policy evaluation, the role of pilot studies, and what kinds of methods and evaluations may be most useful in a social policy context.