Child Protection

Harsh Realities looks at how doctors, nurses, social services, and advisers take vital decisions about our lives. The first programme in the series tackles child abuse. When a medical professional suspects that a child has been assaulted, what course of action should they take? Removing a child from his or her home is a dramatic step. If there is even a hint of doubt about the case, should the professionals act – or play it safe?

This report is an analytical study of the principle areas of social policy affected by the split between the needs of children on the one hand and parents on the other. It is a split that pervades family law, government planning structures for children and parents, and almost every service associated with family life, including health, education, criminal justice, financial support and child protection.

The Children (Scotland) Act 1995 brings together aspects of family, child care and adoption law that affect children. The Act seeks to incorporate the 3 key principles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) – i.e. non- discrimination; a child’s welfare as a primary consideration; and listening to children’s views, into Scottish legislation and practice.

This Act of Scottish Parliament came into force after a report in November 2000, by the then Justice and Home Affairs Committee, which concluded that the law afforded inadequate protection to individuals at risk of abuse from other individuals and the desire to give the police more powers to protect such individuals.

This resource takes you on a journey of discovery where you are invited to challenge ideas, both new and old, in relation to mental health.

This briefing focuses on factors contributing to either stress or resilience in families where one or both parents have mental health problems.

Report looking at the extent and types of bullying of children throughout the UK by presenting and interpreting statistical data gathered by ChildLine and highlighting the key issues surrounding bullying.

This resource is the fifth in a series of lectures designed to honour the memory and achievement of Lord Kilbrandon who wrote one of the most influential policy statements on how a society should deal with 'children in trouble'. This lecture looks at the essentials of the hearings system, human and children's rights, as well as issues of welfare and youth justice.

This paper aims to identify an effective way of feeding findings from research on child abuse commissioned by the Department of Health (1995) into child protection practice.

N.B. This resource is no longer available.