personal outcomes

Understanding and measuring outcomes: the role of qualitative data

Guide that has been developed to support the collection and use of personal outcomes data. Personal outcomes data refers to information gathered from people supported by health and social services and their unpaid carers about what's important to them in their lives and the ways in which they would like to be supported. The guide is divided into three parts.

Part 1 explores the links between an outcomes approach and qualitative data, why qualitative data is important and what it can achieve.

Putting people first: the Swedish way

Video which documents how a small town in Sweden approaches treating and supporting people with dementia.

Dumfries and Galloway Council Social Work Services Supported Self-Asssessment

This resource aims to support people seeking help from Social Work Services by asking them key questions about their lives. Questions focus on what is working in their life, what changes they wish to make, what support and resources they already have or need.

Perspectives on personal outcomes of early stage support for people with dementia and their carers

One of a series of reports which forms part of the PROP Practitioner Research Programme, a partnership between the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) at the University of Edinburgh and IRISS that was about health and social care for older people.

Carer's assessment and outcomes focused approaches to working with carers

One of a series of reports which forms part of the PROP Practitioner Research Programme, a partnership between the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) at the University of Edinburgh and IRISS that was about health and social care for older people.

Developing a personal outcomes approach: Julie Gardener (Audio recording)

Julie Gardener, Assistant Director of VOCAL (Voice of carers across Lothian) talks about developing a personal outcomes approach and outcomes for integration of health and social care. 

The audio recording was made on the 25 February 2013 at an event organised by the Social Services Research Group (SSRG) entitled, 'Improving outcomes through integrated social care and health'.

For further information about the event see: http://ssrg.org.uk/events-2013/

Good conversations: assessment and planning as the building blocks of an outcomes approach

Taking an outcomes approach means engaging with the person and significant others to find out what matters to them, what they hope for and what they want to be different in their lives. An outcomes approach involves thinking about what role the person themselves might play in achieving their outcomes, which can be a significant shift from more traditional services where the solutions are viewed as located on the service side.

This guide looks at what is required to ensure quality assessment and planning in developing an outcomes-focused approach.

Realist Evaluation

What is it? Realist Evaluation provides ongoing information on “what works, for whom, and under which circumstances” thereby allowing for constant and consistent review and potential adaptation of a particular programme or intervention. As well as providing a platform for evidenced based practice, Realist Evaluation can substantially contribute to economic evaluation in the social welfare field, as outcome information and data can demonstrate the ongoing value of initiatives, and show the compensating decreases they are making in other public service expenditure.

Reach: standards in supported living

What is it? A definitive set of standards for supported living. The second edition contains a multimedia CD, video footage, an It's my life pack and a full service review pack. The It's my life toolkit valuates progress towards achieving outcomes desired by individuals. This involves the individual and their circles of support (should not involve service provider). AND Service Review toolkit (takes 12 months) and evaluates the service through service review. This tool is currently being updated.