criminology

Criminal Justice (Scotland) Bill

The Scottish Government introduced the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Bill in the Parliament on 20 June 2013. It includes provisions:

Managing high risk youth pilot project: fact sheet 16

Overview of a project with the overarching aim to ensure all high risk young people and families, regardless of where they live, have access to best advice, practice assessment and interventions addressing their mental health, psychological and forensic risk and needs across Scotland.

Desistance by design: offenders' reflections on criminal justice theory, policy and practice

Article that highlights the views and advice of offenders in Scotland about what helps and hinders young people generally in the process of desistance, why interventions may or may not encourage desistance and what criminal justice and other agencies can do to alleviate the problems which may result in offending.

Turning young lives around: how health and justice services can respond to children with mental health problems and learning disabilities who offend

Briefing paper that has been prepared for youth justice professionals and practitioners, local government directors of children’s services and lead members, directors of public health, clinical commissioning groups and healthcare.

It will help to inform the development of Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategies. It will be of particular use to those involved in commissioning services, and for those concerned to ensure that the particular needs of children who offend, especially those with mental health problems and learning disabilities, are recognised and met. 

Taking stock of alternatives to secure accommodation or custody for girls and young women in Scotland

Small-scale, scoping study that provides a synthesis of existing knowledge about girls and young women at risk of secure care or custody, and ways in which earlier intervention strategies and alternatives to secure care and accommodation could be developed specific to their needs.

British Society of Criminology

The British Society of Criminology aims to further the interests and knowledge of both academic and professional people who are engaged in any aspect of work or teaching, research or public education about crime, criminal behaviour and the criminal justice systems in the United Kingdom.

The Society has been in existence for 50 years and has a wide-ranging membership based here and overseas.

The Internet Journal of Criminology

Online journal of primary criminology research papers written by some of the most up and coming criminologists in their fields.

Although these criminology papers are not anonymously peer reviewed, like those in the articles section of the journal, primary research papers are reviewed and edited by the General Editor and members of the Editorial Board to ensure they meet the high standards of the Internet Journal of Criminology.

Scottish Journal of Criminal Justice Studies

Online journal including presentations by Rob Allen, Kathleen Marshall and original articles by Michele Burman on the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research, by Jenny Johnstone and Vivian Leacock on Managing equality in the criminal justice process, and by Simon Mackenzie on game theory and the evolution of cooperation in criminal justice policy.

Fair access to justice? Support for vulnerable defendants in the criminal courts

Briefing paper that has been prepared for criminal justice, healthcare and legal professionals and practitioners, members of the judiciary, and local government directors of adult and children’s services and lead members in England and Wales.

It will be of particular use to those working in liaison and diversion services in England and criminal justice liaison services in Wales; magistrates; defence lawyers and court staff.

Open justice: empowering victims through data and technology

Report that shows how the digital environment has the potential to make public services such as the criminal justice agencies more accountable, participatory, collaborative, accessible, responsive and efficient.

It also assesses the degree to which such technologies have so far been utilised within the criminal justice system and explores what victims think about these innovations. In doing so, it looks at surveys of victims’ attitudes towards the criminal justice system and draws on the findings of focus groups undertaken with victims of crime for the purposes of this report.