Adobe Flash

Statistics release: adults with learning disabilities: implementation of ‘The same as you?’ Scotland 2010

This Statistics Release provides national figures supplied by local authorities in Scotland for adults with learning disabilities.
The statistics in this publication are a result of ‘The same as you?’ review of services for people with learning disabilities, published in May 2000.2 The review proposed 29 recommendations for developing learning disability services and set out a programme for change over 10 years.

Widening choices for older people with high support needs

This study identifies the benefits and potential of options based on mutuality (people supporting each other) and / or reciprocity (people contributing to individual and group well-being). The study was published by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) in January 2013. Full report and summary report available.

Singing and health: a systematic mapping and review on non-clinical research

The aims of this study are: to systematically identify existing published research on singing, wellbeing and health; to map this research in terms of the forms of singing investigated, designs and methods employed and participants involved: to critically appraise this body of research, and where possible synthesise findings to draw general conclusions about the possible benefits of singing for health. The hypothesis underpinning this review is that singing, and particularly group singing, has a positive impact on personal wellbeing and physical health.

Animated Minds

'Animated Minds' is a series of animated documentaries using real testimony from survivors of mental illness, combined with engaging and sometimes humorous visuals, to climb inside the minds of the mentally distressed. Windows into experiences rarely seen, each piece draws us in to these people's inner worlds, journeying around the landscape of their minds, and leaving us with a greater understanding of what it is to suffer from mental distress.

Elearning : managing knowledge to improve social care

E-learning programme that sets out to help frontline social workers gain a basic understanding of the principles and practice of knowledge management, as well as organise and manage their knowledge and information as effectively as possible.

The practitioner, the agency and inter-agency collaboration

This resource focuses particularly on the agency and inter-agency aspects of collaboration by introducing the situation of an older man, Norman Grant and the agencies supporting him.

Working collaboratively in different types of teams

This resource uses examples drawn from different services and teams to help you think about team working in the context of inter-professional and inter-agency collaboration. It explores some of the conditions that support effective team working and offers opportunities to reflect on contribution as a team member.

A model of practice and collaboration

This resource recognises that social work/social care are made more complex by the multiple relationships with people and agencies with whom you must collaborate to get your work done. The experiences of a family, the Brooks and the professionals and agencies who work with them, illustrate a ‘model’ designed to help you in planning and reflecting on these multiple collaborations.

Working together to assess needs, strengths and risks

This resource explores the process of planning and undertaking an assessment of needs, strengths and risks with the contribution of other professionals. A family case study is used to illustrate the opportunities and challenges of this process and to help you reflect on the skills involved in working with other professionals and with family members.

Professional identity and collaboration

This resource introduces professional identity as a central factor in interprofessional relationships. It invites users to consider the implications of similarity and difference between professionals and how to sustain identity and practice constructively within collaborative relationships.