user participation

User involvement in mental health services: a case of power over discourse

Public participation in planning and implementing health care has become a government mandate in many states. In UK mental health services, this 'user involvement' policy dates back nearly three decades and has now become enshrined in policy. However, an implementation gap in terms of achieving meaningful involvement and influence for service users persists.

A project to support more effective involvement of service users in adult support and protection activity

Report of a short-term scoping project to explore how social work service practitioners might be better equipped to understand the perspectives of people who may be at risk of harm and to identify ways to improve service user participation in investigations, decision-making and meetings.

Effective engagement in social work education. A good practice guide on involving people who use services and carers

This good practice guide is based on research conducted in 2008 to explore the extent of service user and carer involvement in the higher and further education sectors in west and southeast Scotland.

Involvement of users and carers in social work education: a practice benchmarking study [SCIE report 54]

SCIE report 54. Workforce Development report 54. Since 2002 higher education institutions (HEIs) have been required to develop service user and carer involvement (SUCI) throughout the design and delivery of degree programmes. This small-scale study aims to provide a benchmark of how practice is progressing across the 83 HEIs in England which offer the social work degree, and to support the development of guidance for social work educators. Report published by Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE ) in February 2012.

Towards co-production: taking participation to the next level (Workforce Development Report 53. SCIE report 53)

Short report that details the findings of an independent evaluation of SCIE’s participation function and describes SCIE’s new strategy to work towards co-production.

UK Children's Commissioners' midterm report to the UK State Party on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child

Midterm report by the four Children's Commissioners that has been written in the context of their continued and ongoing dialogue with each UK administration and tier of government.

It is not a comprehensive assessment of every Article in the UNCRC. Instead it has collected evidence from their work focused on five areas: participation, disabled children, child poverty, children seeking asylum and juvenile justice. Where there is evidence it affirms progress but where there is demonstrable lack of improvement in children and young people’s lives, concerns are voiced.

Participative learning

This page describes the learning from EPPI-Centre involvement in workshops on systematic review techniques PHASE. This topic is included in the EPPI-Centre knowledge library. The Knowledge Pages facility enables users to search for the key messages within specific subject areas to which EPPI-Centre reviews have contributed.

Participation (general)

This knowledge page summarises the findings of systematic reviews into the question of what schools can do to become more inclusive, in the particular sense of maximising the participation of all students in their cultures, curricula and communities. This topic is included in the EPPI-Centre knowledge library. The Knowledge Pages facility enables users to search for the key messages within specific subject areas to which EPPI-Centre reviews have contributed.

Consumer involvement in health settings

This topic is included in the EPPI-Centre knowledge library. The Knowledge Pages facility enables users to search for the key messages within specific subject areas to which EPPI-Centre reviews have contributed.

Involving consumers in research and development agenda setting for the NHS : developing an evidence-based approach

This review aims to assess how consumers are involved in deciding what research should be undertaken and if they have any influence. This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2004. Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.