research utilisation

Campbell Collaboration: User Abstracts

Provides user abstracts that give practitioners and others easy access to research results. Most user abstracts are based on Campbell reviews, but some are based on other high-quality systematic reviews. The resource presents the findings of the reviews in a plain language, and focuses on information relevant to practitioners and decision makers, for example, people who need the research evidence in order to make the best decisions concerning other peoples welfare. Topics include domestic violence, children, crime, mental health and older people.

Drinking in the UK: An exploration of trends

A key part of the Government’s alcohol harm reduction strategy is to monitor changes in drinking habits over time and to identify what factors are potentially contributing to the rising levels of consumption. This study is a systematic review of research relevant to trends in alcohol consumption over the last 20 to 30 years in the UK.

Better Together: Scotland's Patient Experience Programme: Patient Priorities for Inpatient Care Report No. 5/2009

This research was commissioned by the Scottish Government as part of Better Together Scotland’s Patient Experience Programme. The objectives of this work were to establish a hierarchy of issues important to Scottish patients receiving hospital inpatient care and to test for differences in priorities among demographic groups. The results could then be used to inform the development of tools to measure inpatient experiences across Scotland.

National Forum on Drug Related Deaths in Scotland: Annual Report 2008-09

This is the second report from the National Forum on Drug-related Deaths. The drug death statistics published each year in the General Register of Scotland (GROS) report are fundamental to the work of the National Forum. This year the GROS report was more detailed than ever before. The report confirmed a disappointing but not unexpected trend.

Older people’s attitudes to automatic awards of Pension Credit

This research looks at older people’s attitudes to the principle of automating parts of the Pension Credit awards process. Three key advantages to automation are highlighted: its capacity to raise awareness of entitlement, its ability to reduce perceptions of stigma, and its convenience. Although the study also reveals concerns about automation, such as privacy, these were rarely felt to be insurmountable and the advantages were generally thought to outweigh them.

Research on the Pensions Education Fund in 2008/09

This document comprises two separate reports on research undertaken in 2008/09 on the Pensions Education Fund (PEF). Part 1 is on the costs associated with the delivery of the main outputs associated with PEF, such as workplace seminars, by Risk Solutions, and Part 2 on the role and activities of pensions information intermediaries (or pensions ‘champions’) in the workplace, by IFF Ltd.

Living on the edge of despair: destitution amongst asylum seeking and refugee children

This report is based on a research study carried out by The Children's Society in the West Midlands during 2007. Charities in the West Midlands have become increasingly concerned about destitution amongst children. The British Red Cross destitution clinic in the West Midlands identified an increasing number of babies, children and young people coming through the project, mainly with their parents.

Review of the Scottish Drugs Forum

The overall aim of this review was to establish the effectiveness of SDF in delivering its aims and objectives, in particular the extent to which it provides value for money in respect of funding received from the Scottish Government; and to evaluate the current and future capacity of the organisation to deliver value for money in light of the new strategic approach to tackling drug use in Scotland.

E-Readiness in the Social Care Sector: Building the capacity for e-learning

The Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) commissioned Ipsos MORI to carry out a research programme with the following objectives: to establish whether the social care sector in England is ready to maximise the use of elearning in terms of technical and organisational infrastructure and in terms of the availability of e-learning content for social care; to provide an assessment of the current capacity of the social care sector as a whole to use and produce e-learning, in particular in internet-based learning, and to exploit its full potential in pursuit of improved services for users