regulation

Report on inquiry into the regulation of care for older people (3rd report, session 4)

The purpose of the inquiry was to investigate whether there were any particular weak points in the regulatory regime of care for older people and whether safeguards were sufficiently robust.

In the wake of high profile events in the care sector such as the collapse of Southern Cross Healthcare Group and closure of the Elsie Inglis Nursing Home following the death of a resident, the Committee considered that it was timely to consider the regulatory system for social care in Scotland and conduct some post-legislative scrutiny in this area.

Dual practice regulatory mechanisms in the health sector : a systematic review of approaches and implementation

The International Centre for Systematic Reviews on Human Resources for Health, Makerere University School of Public Health, working with the EPPI-Centre in London, conducted a systematic review to assess the different regulatory mechanisms employed to deal with dual practice and the effect of these mechanisms on health worker performance. The review aimed at synthesizing the dual practice regulatory mechanisms proposed and implemented worldwide and to document factors key to their implementation, either barriers or facilitators and some of their reported outcomes.

Risky business?

Paper that sets important issues relating to positive risk-taking in adult social care in a legal context; considers how current care provision impacts on the human rights of service users; and analyses the extent to which the present regulatory and commissioning frameworks stifle or encourage risk-taking in adult social care.

A 'four nations' perspective on rights, responsibilities, risk and regulation in adult social care

Paper that reviews the prevailing approaches and attitudes to risk-taking across the four nations of the UK; considers current and likely future regulatory responses regarding this, drawing out similarities and differences and implications for these; and highlights potential areas for shared learning.

Whose risk is it anyway? Risk and regulation in an era of personalisation

Paper that argues that ‘risk’ is often perceived negatively by people using services (used as an excuse used for stopping them doing something) – but risk needs to be shared between the person taking the risk and the system that is trying to support them; states that although some people fear that personalisation may increase risk, it could help people to be safer by putting them more in control of their lives, helping them plan ahead, and focusing our safeguarding expertise on those who really need it; and considers the fact that in an era of personalisation, approaches to risk and regulat

Changing societal attitudes, and regulatory responses, to risk-taking in adult care

Paper that explores the relationship between policy initiatives regarding risk-taking in adult care and its claim to reflect user experience; argues that these policy initiatives are driven by the imperative of rationalising risk management; and claims that such policies are not a response to user demand and that more research is needed to evaluate the attitudes of users of adult care to risk-taking.

The art of living dangerously: risk and regulation

Paper that considers the debate around risk and regulation and the ideological terms it is couched in; demonstrates that the demand that ‘something must be done’ can lead to demands for both more and less regulation; and argues that JRF could develop a more rational approach to risk and regulation, especially for the social care world.

The Big Society and innovation in care and support for adults: key messages from SCIE expert seminars

This paper presents the key messages from two SCIE expert seminars: Innovate and Fly: supporting quality and efficiency in tough times (co-hosted with The Innovation Unit) 9 July 2010; and Big ideas, big society: innovation in care and support (co-hosted with the Department of Health) 5 August 2010.

BBC Radio 4: Disabled Access to Air Transport - disability

BBC Radio 4 programme including an interview about the new EU regulation to improve access for disabled people when using air transport.

Healthcare support workers in Scotland: evaluation of a national pilot of standards and listing in three NHS boards

This report presents the findings of a national pilot which tested arrangements for an employer-led model of regulation and listing of healthcare support workers (HCSWs) in three NHS Scotland health boards.