family members

Think child, think parent, think family: final evaluation report [SCIE report 56]

In July 2009, the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) published a guide entitled Think child, think parent, think family: a guide to parental mental health and child welfare to help services improve their response to parents with mental health problems and their families. This document and its overall ethos are here referred to as ‘think family’. This is the final evaluation report of the project, documenting the progress made by the sites involved, and making recommendations for future activity.

Wider family matters: a guide for family and friends raising children who cannot live with their parents

Update on the publication 'Second time around: a guide for grandparents raising their grandchildren', extending it to address the needs of all family and friends carers.

A policy briefing on family and friends care: raising children within the wider family as an alternative to care

This paper has been developed by Family Rights Group on behalf of the Kinship Care Alliance. It sets out the current context for family and friends carers, our concerns about their circumstances and our recommendations.

Family and friends care: a guide to good practice for local authorities

Urgent action is required at national and local level in order that clear policies and systems are in place in every local authority to ensure that family and friends care arrangements are appropriately assessed and supported.

This good practice guide has been developed to assist local authorities in this task. It is informed by:

· Examples of good practice found in policies sent by local authorities in response to the FOI survey.

What really happened?: child protection case mangement of infants with serious injuries and discrepant parental explanations

This paper reports on a study which examined child protection system assessment and case management of SIDEs (serious injury - discrepant explanation) in 38 families involving 45 seriously - or fatally injured children (0-2 years).

Sociology of the family

Sarah Cunningham-Burley is Professor of Medical and Family Sociology Public Health Sciences and Co-director of the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships at the University of Edinburgh. She is involved in a range of research, including the Growing Up Scotland cohort study and new qualitative longitudinal study of work and family life. She also conducts research on the social aspects of genetics and stem cell research and is a member of the UK government's Human Genetics Commission.

What is needed to end child poverty in 2020?

This Round-up draws on the findings of seven reports about how to take forward different aspects of a child poverty strategy; examines the impact of current policy; and suggests what is needed to ensure the target is met.

Divorce, Dads, and the Well-Being of Children

Divorce is a powerful force in contemporary American family life. Current estimates suggest that between 43 and 50 percent of first-time marriages will end in divorce. Consequently, more than one million U.S. children experience parental divorce each year. The growing number of divorces has profound implications for children, mothers, fathers, and society. The consequences of these family changes for children and society are hotly debated. To bring clarity to this debate, this brief reviews current research about divorce and its consequences for children.