day care

Sure Start children's centres: survey of parents

A survey of 1,496 parents and carers was carried out between August and October 2008 to quantify the reach (i.e. awareness and usage) of Sure Start Children’s Centres among the target population (that is, parents and carers of children aged under five years and expectant parents). The survey was limited to children’s centres which were designated by March 2006 and so had been established for several years.

Safer recruitment for safer services: a report on the quality of recruitment practices in registered care services

Report of an investigation into the recruitment practices of a number of different types of care services in Scotland to determine how well these services were carrying out their legal obligations to recruit safely and rectify bad practice where found.

Systematic map report 2 : the recovery approach in community-based vocational and training adult mental health day services (Research resource 3)

Report describing and discussing a systematic map focusing on the role of vocation, meaningful occupation and training in the refashioning of mental health day services. It includes research on how the recovery approach can operate in community-based vocational and training adult mental health services.

Redesigning mental health day services : a modernisation toolkit for London

The London Development Centre, with the support of the Mental Health Foundation, set up the Day Services Modernisation Task Group, drawing on expertise from London’s statutory and voluntary providers, and service users. This modernisation toolkit is the main output of the group. London’s day services, like those found in the rest of the country, represent a broad mix of voluntary, statutory, independent and community based service providers.

Make my day! : the same as you?

'The same as you?' review of services for people with learning disabilities was published in 2000 and set out a 10-year programme of change that would support children and adults with learning disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorders (including Asperger’s Syndrome) to lead full lives, giving them choice about where they live and what they do.

This report was produced by the Day Services Group, a subgroup of the National Implementation Group, which was set up to look at how day services in Scotland are putting the recommendations of The same as you? (SAY) into practice.

Delivering the Government's mental health policies : services, staffing and costs

Report presenting the findings of a research project which aimed to identify the specification and costing of a mental health service for England which delivers the UK Government's key policy objectives for mental health as set out in the National Service Framework for Mental Health.

Living from day to day : a research project on older family carers of people with learning disabilities

Report of a study which looked into the experiences, views and attitudes of older family carers who are living with and caring for adult relatives with learning disabilities with a view to finding out how local services can be more responsive to this group.

A commissioner's guide to service user involvement in the re-commissioning of day and vocational services for people with mental health conditions

Guide providing information and advice for health and social care commissioners on how best to involve users of mental health services in the re-commissioning of day and vocational services. It is based on the experiences of commissioners and service users who collaborated on re-designing and modernising local services.

The same as you?: a review of services for people with learning disabilities

This review of services for people with learning disabilities began by looking at services, especially in social and healthcare, and their relationship with education, housing, employment and other areas. It also focused on people’s lifestyles and wider policies including social inclusion, equality and fairness, and the opportunity for people to improve themselves through continuous learning. The review also recommends that for all but a few people, health and social care should be provided in their own homes or in community settings alongside the rest of the population.