So You Think You Know Me?

This podcast, part of the Glasgow School of Social Work Research Seminar series held in Glasgow on the 4th July 2008, in order to explain the launch of "So You Think You Know Me?" book, by Allan Weaver. The book is an autobiography of an ex-offender and former inmate of Barlinnie Prison, now a social work team-leader in his native Scotland.

How unwanted acts become crimes (Radio 4 series: Thinking Allowed)

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on the way in which unwanted acts can become crimes. The relationship between levels of crime and fear of crime continues to exercise academics and policy makers alike. The question is asked if soaring prison populations accurately reflect the former or the latter. Laurie Taylor is joined by Nils Christie, Professor of Criminology at the University of Oslo, who argues that crime is a product of cultural, social and mental processes.

Race relations in prison: responding to adult women from black and minority ethnic backgrounds

This paper provides an overview of the different experiences and specific needs of minority ethnic adult women in prison, highlighting the contextual effects of multiple discrimination; being a ‘woman’, from a ‘minority ethnic’ group, often from ‘minority nationality groups’ and from ‘lower socio-economic’ backgrounds.

Unlocking the prison estate : modernising the prison system in England and Wales (Research note no.4)

Paper addressing the question of overcrowding in the prison system in England and Wales and arguing that one way to increase capacity in the system is for the UK Government to unlock the value of the prison estate which would release funds to build modern prisons and increase the number of prison places.