law courts

Criminal Justice (Scotland) Bill

The Scottish Government introduced the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Bill in the Parliament on 20 June 2013. It includes provisions:

A criminal justice revolution? ‘Tough love,’ problem-solving courts and community justice

Lecture given by Professor Eric Miller, Saint Louis University Law School, USA at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland (March 2012)

The Carloway Review: report and recommendations

In October 2010, the Cabinet Secretary for Justice, Kenny MacAskill MSP, decided that it was necessary to review key elements of Scottish criminal law and practice in the light of the decision of the United Kingdom Supreme Court in Cadder

Family justice review: final report

Final report, which reflects conclusions following well over 600 responses to our consultation and input from meetings in many parts of the country. We have also had the benefit of the Justice Select Committee’s report on the operation of the family courts, published in July. This final report aims to be a free standing document but does not analyse the issues facing the family justice system in the detail of the interim report. It sets out final recommendations for reform, highlighting where these have changed and where they have not.

The Scottish criminal justice system: the criminal courts

One of six briefing papers covering various aspects of the Scottish criminal justice system. It provides a brief description of the operation of the criminal courts in Scotland.

International Criminal Court (Scotland) Act 2001

The Act, in tandem with the International Criminal Court Act 2001 ('the UK Act'), will enable the United Kingdom to ratify the Statute of the International Criminal Court, which was adopted on 17 July 1998 at Rome.

Inside out : the case for improving mental healthcare across the criminal justice system

Report describing the obstacles to court diversion schemes for offenders with mental health problems in England and Wales and arguing that early and more structured interventions by the health care and justice systems would improve care and reduce the cost of crime. It identifies examples of good practice in this area in England and Wales and points to the potential of a new model in mental health courts.

Sexual Offences (Procedure and Evidence) (Scotland) Act 2002

This Act of Scottish Parliament has two main purposes. These are to prevent the accused in a sexual offence case from personally cross-examining the complainer; and to strengthen the existing provisions restricting the extent to which evidence can be led regarding the character and sexual history of the complainer. The first purpose will be achieved by requiring the accused to be legally represented throughout his or her trial.

Criminal Procedure (Amendment) (Scotland) Act 2002

This Act of Scottish Parliament covers intermediate diets and how they relate to arrest warrants. An intermediate diet is a hearing set by a court, in summary criminal proceedings, for the purpose of ascertaining, so far as is reasonably practicable, whether the case is likely to proceed to trial on the date assigned as a trial diet. If an accused does not appear as required for an intermediate diet, the court may grant a warrant for his or her arrest.

Human Rights Act 1998

This Act brings the rights and freedoms of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) into UK jurisdiction.