care workers

Personalisation: What do we Mean?

Wendy Harrington, Professional Development Manager with the Association of Directors of Social Work, speaks about personalisation and community capacity building in Scotland. This talk was delivered at Personalisation and Community Capacity, a joint seminar and workshop by the Perth and Kinross Council and University of Stirling Partnership. It was held at the University of Stirling on 4 December 2009.

Looked-after children: third report of session 2008-09: volume II: oral and written evidence

Provides the detailed oral and written evidence presented to the Children, Schools and Families Select Committee session on looked after children. The session aimed to investigate the performance of the care system in England, consider whether the Governments proposals for reform were soundly based, and to find out whether the Care Matters programme would be effective in helping looked after children. A summary of the findings are provided in Volume I.

Healthcare support workers in Scotland: evaluation of a national pilot of standards and listing in three NHS boards

This report presents the findings of a national pilot which tested arrangements for an employer-led model of regulation and listing of healthcare support workers (HCSWs) in three NHS Scotland health boards.

Looked-after children: third report of session 2008-09: volume I: report, together with formal minutes

Presents the findings of the Children, Schools and Families Select Committee which aimed to investigate the performance of the care system in England, consider whether the Governments proposals for reform were soundly based, and to find out whether the Care Matters programme would be effective in helping looked after children.

Why people disagree about direct payments and personal budgets

The author discusses some of the reasons for the different responses to personalisation. Four of the underlying issues identified are: misunderstanding key concepts; not comparing like with like; attitudes to current services and different views about what constitutes good evidence.

Reducing gender inequalities to create a sustainable care system (Summary report)

Four in five paid carers are women, because of gender norms and also the gender pay gap which makes it more costly for men to reduce employment hours. However, as more women move into other employment, the sector is struggling to recruit and retain staff. Susan Himmelweit from the Open University and Hilary Land from the University of Bristol examine what can be done to attract enough carers to meet society's increasing care needs.

Poor supervision continues to hinder child protection practice

Lord Laming's report into the death of Victoria Climbie highlighted the importance of good quality staff supervision. Highlights the lack of improvement in staff supervision over the last 6 years and discusses the need for more consistent standards.

Practice guide 5: Implementing the Carers (Equal Opportunities) Act 2004

The purpose of this guide is to offer quick and easy access to information that will aid the implementation of the 2004 Act alongside previous related legislation. The guide explores a number of areas and you will see these listed on the left hand menu. For each topic area the guide includes: key research and policy findings; ideas from practice; links to further information. It also includes related areas of practice not specific to the Act that are useful to its implementation.

Safer recruitment for safer services: a report on the quality of recruitment practices in registered care services

Report of an investigation into the recruitment practices of a number of different types of care services in Scotland to determine how well these services were carrying out their legal obligations to recruit safely and rectify bad practice where found.