anti-social behaviour

Roots of empathy: report on research 2009

Roots of Empathy (ROE) is an evidence-based classroom program which has proven effective in reducing levels of aggression among school children while raising social/emotional competence. Early evaluations of the program's effectiveness are based on the selection of two groups of children: from classrooms participating in ROE and comparison classrooms not participating. The main goals of evaluation have been to assess any changes in social behaviour of ROE children.

Public attitudes to youth crime: report on focus group research

Paper that reports the findings of a series of focus groups set up to explore public attitudes to youth crime.

The topics included the respondents‟ views of:
- the extent of crime and anti-social behaviour (ASB) in the local community and the perceived causes of these
- restorative justice
- volunteering and the role of the community in preventing crime and in supporting youth justice.

The Scottish social housing charter

Charter that set the standards and outcomes that all social landlords should aim to achieve when performing their housing activities.

The Charter has seven sections covering: equalities; the customer/landlord relationship; housing quality and maintenance; neighbourhood and community; access to housing and support; getting good value from rents and service charges; and other customers.

Early intervention: informing local practice

The Local Government Association (LGA) commissioned the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) to carry out a review of early intervention approaches to inform the practice of local authorities(LAs).

This study complements three other studies funded or supported by the LGA to help authorities to evidence impact and assess value for money (VfM).

Payment by results in tackling youth crime

Notes from a seminar held on Monday 24th October 2011 at the Nuffield Foundation. The seminar took place as a round-table discussion attended by 28 policy makers, youth justice practitioners, researchers, specialists from children’s organisations and think-tanks. Sara Nathan OBE, a broadcaster and a member of the Judicial Appointments Commission as well as the Independent Commission on Youth Crime, chaired the meeting.

Perceptions of crime, engagement with the police, authorities dealing with anti-social behaviour and Community Payback: findings from the 2010/11 British Crime Survey

Bulletin which is the first in a series of supplementary volumes that accompany the main annual Home Office Statistical Bulletin, ‘Crime in England and Wales 2010/11’.

Figures included in this bulletin are from the British Crime Survey (BCS), a large, nationally representative, face-to-face victimisation survey in which people resident in households in England and Wales are asked about their experiences of crime in the 12 months prior to interview.

Fathers and youth's delinquent behaviour

Paper that analyses the relationship between having one or more father figures and the likelihood that young people engage in delinquent criminal behaviour. It pays particular attention to distinguishing the roles of residential and non-residential, biological fathers as well as stepfathers.

Dad and me: research into the problems caused by absent fathers

Report that looks closely at the impact a father’s absence has on his children’s lives. The negative effects of a father's absence manifest in all kinds of ways; through anti-social behaviour and criminal activity, and sometimes through heavy drinking and drug use.

A qualitative study surveyed 48 young people from Addaction services in Liverpool, London and Derby. These young people were drawn from a range of culturally diverse backgrounds and social classes, and were all aged between 16 and 25. The group was evenly split between genders (26 being male, 22 female).

Dad and me: research into the problems caused by absent fathers

Report that looks closely at the impact a father’s absence has on his children’s lives. The negative effects of a father's absence manifest in all kinds of ways; through anti-social behaviour and criminal activity, and sometimes through heavy drinking and drug use.

A qualitative study surveyed 48 young people from Addaction services in Liverpool, London and Derby. These young people were drawn from a range of culturally diverse backgrounds and social classes, and were all aged between 16 and 25. The group was evenly split between genders (26 being male, 22 female).

Reducing gang related crime : a systematic review of ‘comprehensive’ interventions

The aim of this review was to find out if ‘comprehensive’ interventions are more effective at reducing gang related criminal activity and anti-social behaviour than usual service provision. This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2009. .Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.