Research soundbites: crime and justice

Video recordings produced as a result of joint work by IRISS and the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR) on the topic of recent crime and justice research.

The videos offer short 'research soundbites' based on recent or forthcoming research, and a series of crime and justice discussion recordings which capture academics, policy makers and practitioners talking about key issues around crime and justice in Scotland.

The videos include:
1. Andy Aitchison, lecturer in social policy at the University of Edinburgh, talking about his book, 'Making the transition: international intervention, state-building and criminal justice reform in Bosnia and Herzegovina', which was published in early 2011. Here he discusses some of the key issues explored in the book, which include the role of the criminal justice system in state building, and the role of international agencies in both re-building but also changing criminal justice.

2. Bill Munro, lecturer at the University of Stirling, talking about issues around criminal justice and utopia. He is currently exploring these ideas with Margaret Malloch (also from the University of Stirling), and they are in the process of developing some of their thoughts into a book proposal.

3. Mary Munro talking about a new book she edited with Hazel Croall and Gerry Mooney, entitled 'Criminal justice in Scotland'. The book was published in December 2010.

4. Sarah MacQueen, from the University of Edinburgh, talking about a report she co-authored with Ben Bradford about Diversion from Prosecution. This report was commissioned by the Scottish Government (the SG) as a result of concerns about the decrease in the numbers of cases being diverted from prosecution. To investigate these issues further, Sarah and Ben conducted a small-scale research study on the use of social work related diversion schemes by Procurators Fiscal in three Community Justice Authorities in Scotland.

The work is funded by the Higher Education Academy: Subject Network for Sociology, Anthropology, Politics.

Publisher: 
Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR)
Published: 
2011
No votes yet