Drug testing in the workplace: Summary conclusions of the Independent Inquiry into Drug Testing at Work

The report of an independent Inquiry examining what role, if any, drug testing should play in the workplace. The Independent Inquiry into Drug Testing at Work - set up in 2002 - brought together a distinguished body of commissioners to examine the evidence relating to drug testing at work in the UK. Its establishment followed the rapid expansion of workplace drug testing in the United States and growing evidence that drug testing companies were expanding their operations in the UK.

Drawing on evidence from a wide range of experts, the report examines: the context for today’s debate about workplace testing; the business case for testing; the scientific, legal, ethical, social, economic and cultural dimensions; and the growth and development of testing in the UK.

The Inquiry concludes that there is no justification for drug testing in the workplace as a means of policing the private behaviour of employees, or of improving performance and productivity. It suggests that although drug testing does have a role to play, particularly where safety is a concern, investment in management training and systems is likely to have a more positive impact and to be less costly, divisive and invasive.

Publisher: 
joseph roundtree foundation
Published: 
2004
Collection: 
No votes yet