Planning/Personalisation

Executive Summary
Dundee Carers Centre commissioned Animate to carry out research into the current and future provision of Short Breaks/Respite for adults in Dundee, on behalf of the Dundee Partnership. The main purpose of the research was to help local service planners improve Short Break provision in line with the overall principles of the Scottish Government’s policy intentions: protecting young carers, enabling self - care and working with adult carers as partners in care, by:
• improving planning of Short Break services

Personal budgets are now a core part of social care and will be an increasingly significant part of the future of healthcare and education for many. We have moved on from their introduction in the Putting People First concordat in 2007 with an expectation that 30% of people would be using them by 2011 – to the Care Act requirement that all eligible people should hold one.

This research is from England carried out by In-Control to evidence the impact of personal budgets on those who use them and services.

The Easy Consultation Toolkit is designed to help short break providers and others with short break consultation.

Rather than duplicate existing work on the principles of consultation, this toolkit provides a set of adaptable, practical tools.

The Time to Live strand is part of the Creative Breaks programme and awards grants directly to individual carers so that they can arrange and pay for the short break that suits them best. In 2011 the Time to Live strand was piloted with 12 organisations who offer support to carers based upon geographical boundaries. In 2012 the application was extended to include organisations with a national, condition specific focus. This evaluation examines the projects running from October 2012 through to September 2013.

No one would argue that unpaid family carers should not be equal partners in care, as their care constitutes over 50% of all care provided in every local authority and NHS region of Scotland. Consistent and meaningful carer engagement must therefore be at the heart of all good health and social care policy. But a great gulf remains between good intentions and good practice. The Coalition of Carers in Scotland is pleased to o!er the carer engagement standards in this document as a bridge to help planning o"cers and commissioners of services move from good intentions to better practice.

This study examines the experiences of older people with high support needs involved in support based on mutuality and reciprocity. It shares the benefits and outcomes achieved for individuals, families, communities and organisations funding and providing this support. The findings are relevant to the future funding and delivery of long-term care, and the transformation of local services. The report highlights how:

The overall aim of our inquiry was to examine respite provision in Clackmannanshire for carers of adults with learning disabilities living in the family home and to look at examples of good practice in other areas. For the purpose of our study we defined respite care as short-term care that helps a family take a break from the daily routine and stress. It can be provided in the family home or in a variety of out-of-home settings and involve either time apart or time together with extra support.

This pilot project was set up by Falkirk Council to determine whether the use of vouchers for short breaks could help to address the low uptake of short breaks among people with severe and enduring mental illness and their carers, and also to provide an alternative to Direct Payments. The project was developed in response to:

This report presents the findings of research carried out by ENABLE Scotland between April 2011 and April 2012 with the aim of improving knowledge and understanding of emergency planning for carers in Scotland, particularly within the wider context of Carer’s Assessments.

The report has two main objectives:

1. To establish the provision of support to carers with emergency planning across all local authority areas, highlighting examples of good practice and producing recommendations based on the findings.

2. To explore the role of sibling carers.

This report describes the findings of research carried out between August and December 2011 into the experiences of unpaid carers in accessing and using short breaks (respite care). The study explored, from the carers’ perspective the benefits of short breaks (provided by formal services and family and friends), good practice in planning and provision, deficits and areas for improvement. Research findings are based on 1210 responses to a Scotland-wide survey distributed through carer organisations, four focus groups involving 36 carers and 13 interviews.