Evidence of impact of short breaks (respite care)

Report by the Muscular Dystrophy Campaign into the lack of age appropriate short breaks (respite care) provision for disabled young adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other neuromuscular and long-term conditions.

The Time to Live strand is part of the Creative Breaks programme and awards grants directly to individual carers so that they can arrange and pay for the short break that suits them best. In 2011 the Time to Live strand was piloted with 12 organisations who offer support to carers based upon geographical boundaries. In 2012 the application was extended to include organisations with a national, condition specific focus. This evaluation examines the projects running from October 2012 through to September 2013.

In 2012 Natural England commissioned Dementia Adventure (a Community Interest Company which connects people living with dementia, with nature and a sense of adventure) to review the existing evidence of the benefits and barriers facing people living with dementia in accessing the natural environment and their local green space.

The Better Breaks programme awarded its first grants in March 2012. 51 grants, totalling £1,121,602 were distributed to projects across Scotland so that these projects could deliver quality short breaks for children and young people with disabilities which would be tailored to their needs whilst giving their families a break from caring.
The evaluation was based on information provided by the funded projects through their applications, their End of Grant reports, any supporting materials provided, selected telephone calls and review of the Shared Stories films.

The Easy Evaluation Toolkit is designed to help people evaluate their short break or respite care service. Created in 2013 by Shared Care Scotland, Evaluation Support Scotland and a panel of third sector managers, the toolkit offers a framework, case studies and useable tools to help you and your service develop your evaluation process.

The overall aim of our inquiry was to examine respite provision in Clackmannanshire for carers of adults with learning disabilities living in the family home and to look at examples of good practice in other areas. For the purpose of our study we defined respite care as short-term care that helps a family take a break from the daily routine and stress. It can be provided in the family home or in a variety of out-of-home settings and involve either time apart or time together with extra support.

This pilot project was set up by Falkirk Council to determine whether the use of vouchers for short breaks could help to address the low uptake of short breaks among people with severe and enduring mental illness and their carers, and also to provide an alternative to Direct Payments. The project was developed in response to:

The Short Breaks Fund represents a substantial investment by the Scottish Government in the development of short breaks’ provision. Scottish Government, Shared Care Scotland and the National Carer Organisations group are keen to make sure that there is a legacy from this investment, not simply in the form of additional or new short break services, but through better knowledge about what works well in short break services, and about what carers and those they care for need and value.
This report evaluates the impact of funding on 58 projects and...

This report presents the findings of research carried out by ENABLE Scotland between April 2011 and April 2012 with the aim of improving knowledge and understanding of emergency planning for carers in Scotland, particularly within the wider context of Carer’s Assessments.

The report has two main objectives:

1. To establish the provision of support to carers with emergency planning across all local authority areas, highlighting examples of good practice and producing recommendations based on the findings.

2. To explore the role of sibling carers.

This report describes the findings of research carried out between August and December 2011 into the experiences of unpaid carers in accessing and using short breaks (respite care). The study explored, from the carers’ perspective the benefits of short breaks (provided by formal services and family and friends), good practice in planning and provision, deficits and areas for improvement. Research findings are based on 1210 responses to a Scotland-wide survey distributed through carer organisations, four focus groups involving 36 carers and 13 interviews.