survey

The Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS) is a large-scale continuous survey measuring adults’ experience and perceptions of crime in Scotland. The survey is based on, annually, 13,000 face-to-face interviews with adults (aged 16 or over) living in private households in Scotland.

Data from the Census in 2001 found that carers are a third more likely to be in poor health than non carers. The more recent Scottish Household Survey found that 12% of carers reported that they were in poor health. This increases to 18% for those caring for 20 hours or more each week. 12% of people termed in the Scottish Household Survey as “economically inactive” providing care also consider themselves to be permanent sick or disabled.

The overall aim of our inquiry was to examine respite provision in Clackmannanshire for carers of adults with learning disabilities living in the family home and to look at examples of good practice in other areas. For the purpose of our study we defined respite care as short-term care that helps a family take a break from the daily routine and stress. It can be provided in the family home or in a variety of out-of-home settings and involve either time apart or time together with extra support.

Cross-sectional analysis of self-reported questionnaire data collected from members of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort, England. Respondents (n = 4810) were aged 16–17 years old and have been followed up since birth.

TNS-BMRB was commissioned by the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission to undertake a survey of clients who had used the CM Options service since its inception in July 2008.

The primary objective of the survey was to measure the following Commission target for 2010: “The number of children, by March 31st 2010, who are benefiting from a private arrangement which has been put in place following contact with the Child Maintenance Options service.”

The Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS) is a large-scale continuous survey measuring people’s experience and perceptions of crime in Scotland, based on 13,000 in-home face-to-face interviews conducted annually with adults (aged 16 or over) living in private households in Scotland.

The results are presented in a series of reports including this one, which provides information on partner abuse. The 2010/11 survey is the third sweep of the SCJS, with the first having been conducted in 2008/09.

Report that presents a summary of the latest information collected from the full wave one of the Life Opportunities Survey (LOS), for which fieldwork was conducted across Great Britain between June 2009 and March 2011.

A report based on the interim results - year one of the first wave of fieldwork - was published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) in December 2010. The findings in this report replace the findings presented in the interim report.

Survey which aimed to find out more about the levels of isolation families with disabled children experience and how this impacts on their family life. It also explores what would help families most when they feel isolated and whether the growth of the internet and social networks help.

Research that aimed to investigate the nature and extent of youth homelessness in England, and specifically to find out:

Early findings from the Children's Society's third national survey of young runaways, 2011.

The main aims of the survey were:
1. To provide up-to-date findings on rates and experiences of running away comparable with the two previous surveys conducted in 1999 and 2005
2. To provide new insights into the links between running away and other aspects of children’s lives, through the exploration of issues not covered in previous surveys, such as family change and subjective well-being.