domestic violence

This report presents the results of a secondary analysis of data collected for the Tayside Domestic Abuse and Substance Misuse Project by a different research team. The secondary analysis was conducted by Dolev & Associates, with funding from the Scottish Government Multiple and Complex Needs Initiative. An attempt was made to identify depositional and organisational factors that shape the experiences of women who are affected by domestic abuse and their own substance misuse at each stage of their service use.

Mind is a leading mental health charity in England and Wales and has produced information on many areas of mental health. This booklet looks at why men or women behave violently. It explains how people can learn to express their anger safely, and where to get help. It also offers advice to those who may be a target.

Toolkit based on themes which have been found to be effective in combating domestic abuse. It is made up of one easy to use 'core' lesson which teachers or other professionals working with children can use for each year group from reception to year 13.

This paper highlights the key education-related findings of a one-year research project commissioned by the Countryside Agency and Save the Children exploring service provision for children who experience domestic violence in rural areas in England. The project involved in-depth interviews with children, young people and a small sample of parents, as well as service providers in the education, health, social services, refuge, housing and criminal justice sectors.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at whether domestic violence is a gender issue. The most recent British Crime Survey shows that one in four women and one in six men have suffered domestic violence at some point in their lives. As part of Domestic Violence Awareness Week, Woman's Hour looks at the statistics and asks how helpful it is to think about domestic violence as either a male or female problem.

This paper highlights the key findings related to health workers of a one-year research project commissioned by the Countryside Agency and Save the Children exploring service provision for children who experience domestic violence in rural areas in England. The project involved in-depth interviews with children, young people and a small sample of parents as well as service providers in the education, health, social services, refuge, housing and criminal justice sectors.

This resource is a summary of a research report into the Tayside Domestic Abuse and Substance Misuse Project. The findings presented in this report include a review of the literature on the links between domestic abuse and substance misuse, and secondary analysis of service user questionnaires, interviews with service users and interviews with domestic abuse and substance misuse service providers.

The Countryside Agency commissioned Save the Children to manage this research, which took place in 2002. It aims to explore the nature and extent of domestic violence support provision for children and young people living in rural areas in England, to identify examples of good practice, and to highlight implications for policy, practice and improvements in the provision of domestic violence services. It responds to an identifiable research and policy vacuum relating to domestic violence services for children and young people living in rural areas.

This resource is part of BBC 4's Woman's Hour website. It is a timeline of women's history. Each decade from 1900 to 1999 is represented and includes a list of key events for each decade.

Users can click on a key event to find out more about what happened and can also select the LISTEN icons to hear interviews and special archive content about the period.

This document talk about domestic violence and how it affects children. Domestic violence can happen in any family and in all kinds of homes. In half of the cases of violence between adults, children get hurt too. Even when children do not see the violence happening, they often hear it. Children are often in the same or next room when the violence is going on. This can be extremely distressing and disturbing for them.