drug misuse

This is a joint Scottish Government and CoSLA statement which is addressed to anyone who has a role in improving outcomes for an individual, families or communities experiencing problematic drug and alcohol use. A statement which sets out the aim of identifying all actions required to deliver the alcohol and drug workforce and to outline the important roles and contributions of those directly involved in workforce development.

In 2001, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation embarked upon a unique and challenging programme of research that explored the problem of illicit drugs in the UK. The research addressed many questions that were often too sensitive for the government to tackle. In many cases, these studies represented the first research on these issues and the policy implications have been far-reaching. This report outlines the results of the largest independent programme of drugs research of its kind within the UK.

In March 2008, a new 10 year national drugs strategy document was published: Drugs: protecting families and communities. This new drug strategy presents an agenda which strongly reinforces the main points of the last strategy with its emphasis on crime reduction and community safety. Like its predecessor, it says less about individual health and social outcomes. In the same month the United Kingdom Drug Policy Commission, (UKDPC), an independent think tank, published a major report on the drugs strategy and its key focus criminal justice.

WIRED is a grassroots initiative to tackle drug and alcohol misuse that merges real world activities with a website for the purpose of disseminating information, providing support, education and training, carrying out research, and enhancing the impact and reach of other successful programmes.

In 2006, Aberlour Child Care Trust and the Scottish Association of Drug and Alcohol Teams joined together to hold a second Think Tank to address the question 'Alcohol or Drugs' Does it make a difference for the Child?'. This report is entirely drawn from the Think Tank’s discussions and represents the knowledge and views of experienced managers, practitioners and researchers. It does not include evidence from research or the content of policy and guidance documents.

This document sets out a new framework for local partnerships on alcohol and drugs. It aims to ensure that all bodies involved in tackling alcohol and drugs problems are clear about their responsibilities and their relationships with each other; and to focus activity on the identification, pursuit and achievement of agreed, shared outcomes.

European Association for the Treatment of Addiction (EATA) is the umbrella organisation for the independent drug and alcohol treatment and aftercare sector. EATA represents services throughout the continuum of care. EATA is a registered charity, working to ensure that people with substance dependencies get the treatment they need. EATA works on behalf of its members alongside governmental bodies to help ensure improved access and quality of treatment for people with substance dependencies.

This is the report of the Alcohol and Drugs Delivery Reform Group. In January 2008 the Delivery Reform Group to improve alcohol and drug delivery arrangements and ensure better outcomes for service users was established by the Scottish Government. Members were invited from the Scottish Advisory Committee on Drug Misuse (SACDM) and the Scottish Ministerial Advisory Committee on Alcohol Problems (SMACAP).

Drug treatment is provided by a network of services. In 2005, the National Treatment Agency for Substance Misuse (NTA), in partnership with the Healthcare Commission, embarked on a joint three-year programme of annual service reviews as part of an initiative to enhance the quality, consistency and effectiveness of drug treatment.