drug misuse

This blog is written by David Clark, director of Wired In, an organisation that empowers individuals, families and communities to tackle substance use problems, encouraging and enabling people to find their path to recover. This page of the blog has links to short films on recovery and addiction.

Report of a study which aimed to explore the transition from care experienced by young people with a view to identifying any differences in the experiences of recent care leavers when compared to older leavers and pinpointing key factors in the transition which impact on life after care.

Document offering guidance on managing the continuity-of-care journey and treatment pathway that drug misusing offenders in England follow on entering prison, while in prison and on release from prison. The guidance is intended for Criminal Justice Integrated Team managers and workers and Substance Misuse Team managers and workers.

This resource is intended for all clinicians, especially those providing pharmacological interventions for drug misusers as a component of drug misuse treatment. The report discusses the effectiveness of drug treatment, the impact of drug misuse on families and communities, psychosocial components of treatment, health considerations including preventing drug-related death and blood-borne infections and considered specific treatment situations and populations such as mental health, criminal justice, pregnancy, young people and prisons.

A growing number of children are affected by parental substance misuse, and policy and practice increasingly recognise the need to tackle the problems that this causes. Currently, the needs of older children are less well known or addressed. This study explores the experiences of 38 young people, aged 15–27 years, who had at least one parent with a drug or alcohol problem.

In many European countries, one or more general population surveys have been carried out to get an impression of the characteristics of illicit drug use at national level. Despite valuable efforts to standardise national drug surveys among the general populations in European Member States and to enhance cross-national comparability, national drug surveys still use different instruments, reporting formats and methodologies.

Report presenting the findings of a study which aimed to provide a holistic understanding of substance use behaviour among young people in Scotland and identify the key factors which influence alcohol, tobacco and drug use among this group. The report sets out to inform the development of relevant educational programmes and materials for use within schools.

This short training scenario was originally used in the context of introductory child protection training. It gives brief information from which participants are asked to identify what they are concerned about and what they would do next. Sally uses drugs and is pregnant. She has a history of local authority care.

This annual report is based on information provided to the EMCDDA by the EU Member States and candidate countries and Norway (participating in the work of the EMCDDA since 2001) in the form of a national report. The annual report presents the EMCDDA’s yearly overview of the drug phenomenon in the EU and is an essential reference book for those seeking the latest findings on drugs in Europe.

This report presents a number of contributions that relate to analysing communal wastewaters for drugs and their metabolic products in order to estimate their consumption in the community. This area of work is developing in a multidisciplinary fashion, involving scientists working in different research areas. For this reason, the contributions to this publication come from a variety of different perspectives including: analytical chemistry, physiology and biochemistry, sewage engineering, spatial epidemiology and statistics, and conventional drug epidemiology.