social work and social workers

Care is a contentious policy concept. Numbers of people needing care are rising. Radical change is planned for care policy to increase choice and control through ‘personalisation’. A new conceptual framework is now needed to take forward policy and practice for the twenty-first century if people’s rights and needs are to be met.

This publication is intended for everyone who is concerned with looked after children and young people and their families. This includes: elected members, local authority staff, staff in voluntary organisations, private providers, foster carers, health professionals and those involved in developing and improving children’s services.

This resource presents a history of social work in the United States. It consists of five chapters of social work's early years as well as some biographies and off-site resources that seem particularly pertinent to social workers.

Scottish Government evaluation of the Reading Rich programme, a partnership between National Children's Homes Scotland and the Scottish Book Trust which aimed to introduce a 'reading rich' environment for children and young people who are looked after in residential and foster care settings in Scotland so they could benefit from reading, books and literature. It ran from 2004 to 2007.

Presents the findings of the Children, Schools and Families Select Committee which aimed to investigate the performance of the care system in England, consider whether the Governments proposals for reform were soundly based, and to find out whether the Care Matters programme would be effective in helping looked after children.

This lecture was presented by Philippe van Parijs from the Universite Catholique de Louvain, Belgium, with a response from Sir Tony Atkinson, Nuffield College, Oxford. In this lecture, he argues for the introduction of a basic income unconditionally paid to all.

The New Policy Institute has produced its 2008 edition of indicators of poverty and social exclusion in Scotland, providing a comprehensive analysis of trends and differences between groups. Based on the latest available data, its starting point is that, while child and pensioner poverty in Scotland has fallen over the last decade, poverty among working-age adults has remained the same.

This study examined parenting during early and middle childhood within different social and cultural groups in Britain, using a ‘parenting score’ derived from different measurements of parents’ relationships with their children. The study was based on parents’ reports of attitudes, feelings and behaviour recorded in response to specific questions relating to parenting. The study also assessed changes in parenting across time.