treatment

Cross-government website for drug professionals and anyone interested in the national drug strategy.

In December 2002, the Government launched the Updated Drug Strategy 2002. This built upon, and adapted the Government's Drug Strategy Tackling Drugs to Build a Better Britain, launched in 1998. Aiming to reduce the harm that drugs cause to society - communities, individuals and their families - the Drug Strategy has four main elements: young people, reducing supply, communities, treatment.

This briefing uses data from the Police National Computer and the National Drug Treatment Monitoring Database to look for associations between offending behaviour and treatment for substance misuse.

Research into the effects of user involvement on treatment is finding that it makes people feel helped - but not drug-free.

The Mental Health Treatment Requirement (MHTR) is one of 12 options (‘requirements’) available to sentencers when constructing a Community Order or a Suspended Sentence Order. The MHTR can be given to an offender with mental health problems who does not require immediate compulsory hospital admission under the Mental Health Act. If they give their consent, the MHTR requires them to receive mental health treatment for a specified period.

Document setting out the Scottish Government's strategic approach to tackling alcohol misuse in Scotland.

The measures proposed include specific legislative action intended to bring about short term change and more general measures aimed at effecting cultural change in the long term.

This article, pages 8 and 9, covers news and views from the second national service user involvement conference in Birmingham. Using results of a consultation at the event, DDN looks at whether service users had been offered choices about treatment - and whether those choices had worked well for them.

This study match information from the Police National Computer with the NTA’s National Drug Treatment Monitoring System database. Researchers looked at a sample of opiate and crack users who had recently offended but had not been jailed, and had started drug treatment in the community. They found, as well, that offences typically committed by drug addicts, such as theft, fell by almost half when they were in treatment programmes.