treatment

Fifteenth of 17 lectures comprising David Clark's Substance Misuse course for 3rd year psychology undergraduate students in Swansea. This lecture looks at the prescription of methadone as a treatment for opiate addiction and withdrawal. Each of the 17 lectures is linked to separately in the Learning Exchange, along with the main About Drugs website. This resource is available as full colour slides in PDF format, and as simple black and white printouts.

Second annual report which sets out the progress made in 2002 across all 4 pillars of the Executive’s drugs strategy, namely, young people, communities, treatment and availability.

The Alzheimer's Society is the UK's leading care and research charity for people with dementia, their families and carers. They produce information and advice sheets to support those affected by dementia.

This information sheet outlines the symptoms and causes of Alzheimer’s disease, and describes what treatments are currently available.

These guidelines are a revision of 'Drug Misuse and Dependence: Guidelines on Clinical Management' published in 1991. A comprehensive set of guidance is provided for doctors in the assessment, treatment and management of drug users and drug misuse.

Cross-government website for drug professionals and anyone interested in the national drug strategy.

In December 2002, the Government launched the Updated Drug Strategy 2002. This built upon, and adapted the Government's Drug Strategy Tackling Drugs to Build a Better Britain, launched in 1998. Aiming to reduce the harm that drugs cause to society - communities, individuals and their families - the Drug Strategy has four main elements: young people, reducing supply, communities, treatment.

This briefing uses data from the Police National Computer and the National Drug Treatment Monitoring Database to look for associations between offending behaviour and treatment for substance misuse.

Research into the effects of user involvement on treatment is finding that it makes people feel helped - but not drug-free.

The Mental Health Treatment Requirement (MHTR) is one of 12 options (‘requirements’) available to sentencers when constructing a Community Order or a Suspended Sentence Order. The MHTR can be given to an offender with mental health problems who does not require immediate compulsory hospital admission under the Mental Health Act. If they give their consent, the MHTR requires them to receive mental health treatment for a specified period.