assessment

CARA (Child Abuse Risk Assessment) is a web-based learning environment which may be used by child protection investigators as well as caseworkers and followup workers, to think about the complexity of the factors related to the immediate safety and future risk of children. This is an American collaborative project between the Children & Family Research Center, the School of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services.

Report of a study focusing on the support available to asylum seeker and refugee children and their families and how effectively this support meets the educational, social and cultural needs of asylum seeker and refugee pupils in school.

This is a summary article setting out the key points of the main study with the same title to describe and evaluate the current use and operation of safeguarders in Scotland.

An interactive game designed to help students test their knowledge about law and social work. It will help users: acquire and consolidate knowledge of specific legal rules; develop a critical perspective on those rules; describe the location of specific legal rules. It is designed as a fun game similar in structure to the TV show 'Who wants to be a Millionaire'. NOTE: This game is based on the law and practice in England and Wales.

Not all families affected by substance misuse will experience difficulties. However, parental substance misuse may have significant and damaging consequences for children. These children are entitled to help, support and protection, within their own families wherever possible. Sometimes they will need agencies to take prompt action to secure their safety. Parents too will need strong support to tackle and overcome their problems and promote their children’s full potential.

In April 1997 the Social Services Inspectorate undertook an inspection of the child protection services in Cambridgeshire's Social Services Department. This inspection took place at the request of the Parliamentary Under Secretary in the Department of Health following the non-accidental death of Rikki Neave, a child on Cambridgeshire's child protection register. The 1997 inspection identified serious deficiencies in the standard of child protection services in Cambridgeshire.

This review of services for people with learning disabilities began by looking at services, especially in social and healthcare, and their relationship with education, housing, employment and other areas. It also focused on people’s lifestyles and wider policies including social inclusion, equality and fairness, and the opportunity for people to improve themselves through continuous learning. The review also recommends that for all but a few people, health and social care should be provided in their own homes or in community settings alongside the rest of the population.

This report and its companion entitled Safeguarding Children in Whom Illness is Induced or Fabricated by Carers with Parenting Responsibilities, by the Department of Health, is essential reading for all paediatricians and other members of the multi-disciplinary team in the field of child protection. The Department of Health document sets out policy and guidelines for all professionals, whereas this document discusses clinical issues in more detail and provides practical advice for paediatricians.

Social work educators prepare professionals to practice in a variety of settings where they have the opportunity to improve outcomes for their clients who either have an identifiable alcohol use disorder or are at risk for developing one. Lecture-ready modules, developed by top-named experts in alcoholism and social work research, support professional MSW education. Materials include Powerpoint presentations, handout materials, classroom activities, and accompanying case examples to extend student interaction with the subject matter.

This document specifically aims to provide user-friendly information for all health professionals in Scotland. It will be valuable to those who may very rarely come into contact with an abused child or children and their families. It is also an important source of advice for staff who have had more experience in this area and highlights the need for child protection training to be made available for all staff.