health needs

This knowledge review is about parents with physical and/or sensory impairments, learning difficulties, mental health problems, long-term illnesses such as HIV/AIDS, and drug or alcohol problems. Its main focus is on social care, but integral to this are the relationships between social care and health, housing and education. Knowledge review published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in November 2006.

Having a break : good practice in short breaks for families with children who have complex health needs and disabilities. This guide is one of a series published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE). SCIE guides are one-stop shops for social care practitioners, presenting key findings, current legislation and examples of what is working well to guide and inform practice. Guide published in November 2008.

This report is part of the Innovation Series 2011 published by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. This white paper outlines methods and opportunities to better coordinate care with people with multiple health and social needs, and reviews ways that organizations have allocated resources to better meet the range of needs in this population. There is special emphasis on the experience of care coordination with populations of people experiencing homelessness. Discussion includes measures used to track the impact of these efforts on health, costs, and experience of care.

There is concern that the needs of people with alcohol related brain damage (ARBD) and their carers are not being well met by current service provision across Scotland.

The Expert Group which produced this report was set up by the Scottish Executive to achieve better understanding of the issues and problems involved, and to advise on how they can be addressed.

This paper provides an overview of the different experiences and specific needs of minority ethnic adult women in prison, highlighting the contextual effects of multiple discrimination; being a ‘woman’, from a ‘minority ethnic’ group, often from ‘minority nationality groups’ and from ‘lower socio-economic’ backgrounds.

Dignity in Care is a campaign being run by the Department of Health's website in the UK. It "aims to eliminate tolerance of indignity in health and social care services through raising awareness and inspiring people to take action." The focus of the campaign has mainly been on older people but has now been extended to include people with mental health needs. The website provides further information on the different aspects of the campaign, including relevant publications.

This report uses data from the first four waves of the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) to explore health inequalities in the early years.

The measures explored include health outcomes and risk factors for poor health spanning the time from the early stages of pregnancy until just before the children’s fourth birthday.

Report highlighting the continued inequalities in health and well-being experienced by young people who reside in deprived areas in the UK. The study found these young people are less likely to be physically healthy or feel happy with their lives and that programmes designed to help these young people enter employment, education or training have a positive impact on their physical and mental well-being.