social work history

Set within the contexts of probation's centenary in Scotland (2005) and the debate about the future of criminal justice social work in Scotland, this article provides a brief account of the history of probation in Scotland, focusing on the rarely discussed period between 1905 and 1968.

This is a selective summary report of the Inquiry set up following the conviction of two former care workers on 4th of December 1997 by the City of Edinburgh Council’s Policy and Resources Committee to investigate matters arising from these trials. This report summarises the findings of the Inquiry. It includes investigation and review of historical procedures and allegations; review of current procedures, practice and guidelines in operation in the City of Edinburgh; and recommendations to assure that every measure is in place to minimise child abuse.

Following the conviction of two former care workers on 4th of December, 1997, the City of Edinburgh Council’s Policy and Resources Committee agreed to hold an Inquiry into matters arising from these trials. This is the report of the findings of the Inquiry. It includes investigation and review of historical procedures and allegations; review of current procedures, practice and guidelines in operation in the City of Edinburgh; and recommendations to assure that every measure is in place to minimise child abuse.

This website presents the history of Abortion Law in the UK. It's a brief description of the history.

This website provides a history of Hull-House in Chicago and its co-founder Jane Addams. It is constructed at the University of Illinois at Chicago as an on-going research project to engage scholars and students.

'Black Presence: Asian and Black History in Britain' is a partnership between The National Archives (formerly the Public Record Office) and the Black and Asian Studies Association (BASA), funded by the New Opportunities Fund. This exhibition appears on 'Pathways to the Past', the National Archives' website for lifelong learners. The exhibition covers Black and Asian history in Britain from 1500 to 1850.

This resource from the BBC website presents a major thirty-part narrative history series exploring British childhood and the experience of British children over the last thousand years. Open2.net, the online learning portal from the Open University and the BBC, has also produced a stimulating site to accompany the series, which can be linked to from this BBC webpage.

This resource is one of a set of exercises and activities taken from the book 'Modern Social Work Practice' written by Mark Doel and Steven Shardlow. This activity is designed to trigger a consideration of what is different about, and what is common to, the various manifestations of social work. In this chapter, students are encouraged to look for the 'core' of social work practice.

Hidden Lives Revealed focuses on the period 1881-1918, and includes unique archive material about poor and disadvantaged children cared for by The Waifs and Strays' Society. The Society cared for children across England and Wales - in both the densest urban conurbations and some of the smallest rural villages. The Waifs and Strays' Society looked after about 22,500 children between its foundation in 1881 and the end of World War One. The Waifs and Strays' Society became the Church of England Children's Society in 1946 and is now known as The Children's Society.

This resource is one of the units on the Open University's OpenLearn website, which provides free and open educational resources for learners and educators around the world. This Unit looks at the work of William Beveridge in reforming the field of social welfare after World War II. Particular attention is paid to the attitude towards women and immigrants to the United Kingdom.