preventive practice

Systematic reviews of interventions following physical abuse: helping practitioners and expert witnesses improve the outcomes of child abuse

This briefing summarises the results of systematic reviews to investigate whether effective interventions exist for children and families where a child has experienced physical abuse. It focuses on secondary prevention of adverse child outcomes and recurrence of abuse in children who have experienced maltreatment. The interventions are grouped into: child focused; parent focused; and family focused. Implications for practice, policy and research are discussed.

Elder abuse and alcohol

Paper analysing the links between alcohol and elder abuse, looking at the global scale of the problem and discussing the role of public health in prevention.

Obesity : guidance on the prevention, identification, assessment and management of overweight and obesity in adults and children (NICE clinical guideline 43)

Guidance from NICE to assist agencies to stem the prevalence of obesity and diseases associated with it through increasing the effectiveness of interventions to prevent obesity and improving the care offered to adults and children with obesity, especially in primary care.

Clinical guidelines for implementing relapse prevention therapy

Guidelines developed for the Behavioral Health Recovery Management Project. Relapse Prevention Therapy is based on a cognitive-behavioural model of the relapse process. This approach focuses on the immediate precipitating circumstances of relapse as well as on the chain of events that may precede and set-up a relapse.

Review of evidence relating to volatile substance abuse in Scotland

In early 2006, the Scottish Executive Justice Department commissioned a review of the available evidence on volatile substance abuse (VSA) among young people in Scotland, particularly, in relation to the prevalence and nature of VSA, successful prevention of VSA and effective communication of VSA information and messages.

This report details the findings of that review and makes recommendations for the way in which the review of evidence can be used to take forward the volatile substance abuse agenda in Scotland.

The education of children in need

This review examines the education of children in need. It discusses the education of children looked after by local authorities; the impact of the Children Act 1989; the education of children out of school and the way these issues can be addressed.

Social Work Curriculum on Alcohol Use Disorders

Social work educators prepare professionals to practice in a variety of settings where they have the opportunity to improve outcomes for their clients who either have an identifiable alcohol use disorder or are at risk for developing one. Lecture-ready modules, developed by top-named experts in alcoholism and social work research, support professional MSW education. Materials include Powerpoint presentations, handout materials, classroom activities, and accompanying case examples to extend student interaction with the subject matter.

Domestic abuse: a draft training strategy

The focus of this draft strategy is on identifying training and development activity required to support improvement in services to women and children who are experiencing domestic abuse, and to men who use violence.

It is based on increasing capacity to deliver training and providing national co-ordination of training on domestic abuse. This training strategy is set out in 6 sections: context, aims of the training strategy; requirements of the training strategy; taking the strategy forward; capacity building; and an action plan.

Protecting children: a shared responsibility - guidance for health professionals in Scotland (September 1999)

This document specifically aims to provide user-friendly information for all health professionals in Scotland. It will be valuable to those who may very rarely come into contact with an abused child or children and their families. It is also an important source of advice for staff who have had more experience in this area and highlights the need for child protection training to be made available for all staff.