social work approaches

Part of the IRISS What Works: Putting Research Into Practice workshops, this podcast details a talk by Professor Fergus McNeill on the range of practices and procedures for dealing with young people involved, or at risk of being involved, in offending. The event was held on Friday, 5th February 2010.

This podcast is taken from the ''Glasgow School of Social Work Research Seminar Series" held on the 9th October, and features Alan Baird, President of the Association of Directors of Social Work and Director of Social Work, Dundee City Council talks about Changing Lives in the context of what the ADSW is doing to reinvigorate the agenda and progress on personalisation of services.

This briefing focuses on other therapies or measures to help children and young people who deliberately self-harm (DSH). The aim of the therapy is either to reduce the amount they self harm or to stop them self-harming completely. The population covered by this briefing are children and adolescents up to the age of 19 who live in the community. The characteristics of self-harm, and the psychological and psychosocial factors associated with self-harm among children and adolescents are covered in a previous briefing in this series.

This learning object is suitable for use in conjunction case studies once students have appreciated the basic framework of the legal rules. These materials raise awareness of: the complexity of the relationship between law and social work in practice; the breadth of legal knowledge necessary for effective practice; the fact that law cannot be seen in isolation from values, and must be subject to critical analysis; how different options for practice balance legal rules, moral rules and individual and collective rights.

The Social Work Task Force has signalled its intent to come up with a new definition of social work to counter public misconceptions. Anabel Unity Sale reports that with the negative coverage that social work attracts, it is hardly surprising that the public is not clear about what social workers do, and that people are led to believe that professionals swoop in and steal babies from families, give older people with limited mobility a bath and then make their dinner.

This website provides specially designed tools to help social care workers. The tools are quick, easy to use, and do not require any specialist skills expertise. All social care staff use information and communicate in their jobs. To do this they need: speaking and listening skills; reading and writing skills; number skills. Care Skillsbase helps managers in the care sector take constructive action on communication & number skills.

This briefing provides an overview of what personalisation means for commissioners of social care services. It highlights the main tasks for commissioners delivering personalisation as ensuring the right balance of investment and shaping the market. It also looks at necessary changes to contracting and procurement models, with a shift towards outcomes-focused and person-centred approaches. Two practice examples are included.

This multimedia learning object provides an introduction to the "task-centered" model of social work intervention. This model was based on the work of Sigmund Freud and the psychoanalysts. Psychoanalytic social work emphasised relationship-focused intervention with the professional adopting the role of the 'expert'.

The Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) wants to bring together a lot of knowledge about social care, so that information on what works best is available to everyone. This Position paper is about how social care services can be made better by the people who use them - that is, the service users themselves. It brings together the main findings from six reviews that looked at whether service user participation made a difference to changing and improving social care services.