adult services

Adult placements are not a new idea. For centuries, vulnerable people haven been cared for by people other than their family in their homes. But it wasn't until the 1970s and early 1980s however, that adult placement schemes, as an organised service, really took off in the UK. The guide has been developed to inform future guidance for local authority commissioners. It identifies relevant national minimum standards and highlights findings and case examples from the practice survey, as well as from the literature where available.

Adult social care is changing, to ensure that the people who use services are at the heart of their own care and support. This change, outlined in 'Our health, our care, our say' (Department of Health 2006) and confirmed in 'Putting people first' (Her Majesty's Government 2007), will result in greater choice and control for individuals and better support for carers and families. To achieve this, the social care workforce will need to change its approach.

Report that describes how well social work services are performing and what people who use services think about them. The messages are clear; the majority of people of all ages who use services and their carers have valued them and think they have made positive differences to their lives. Staff who provide services are committed and look for ways to improve the services they offer to people.

Reports on current activity and research in relation to information, advice and advocacy and the delivery of 'Putting People First'. The research included: a literature review; a survey of directors of adults social services; a review of a sample of local authority and national websites; and in-depth work with selected local authorities and national organisations. Examples of good practice and recommendations for the development of services are included.

This is a summary of a report on a study that sought to identify: differences in planning for disabled young people in residential schools outside local authority boundaries compared to young people attending their local special schools; the factors which impact on transition planning and transition outcomes for these young people; key areas for future research and the feasibility of such work.

Following the public consultation on a Common Assessment Framework for Adults (CAF) the Department of Health is launching a further phase of Demonstrator Sites to address the issues raised during the consultation, and broaden the coverage of the Demonstrator Site Programme (DSP) to provide further evidence to support the development of CAF.

In this second phase the program was widen with different IT systems currently in use, whether provided commercially or in- house, and to include regional areas of England currently not represented in Phase 1.

The Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) was commissioned by the Department of Health to consult on the green paper Independence, well-being and choice: Our vision for the future of social care for adults in England with service users (or potential service users) who are seldom heard or often described as being ‘hard to reach.'

This protocol outlines transformation required to support personalisation, encompassing joint strategic needs assessment, commissioning that stimulates quality provision, and locally agreed approaches using community resources.

This is a report on a study that sought to identify: differences in planning for disabled young people in residential schools outside local authority boundaries compared to young people attending their local special schools; the factors which impact on transition planning and transition outcomes for these young people; key areas for future research and the feasibility of such work.