adult services

A joint discussion document on the future of services for older people. One of two linked documents produced by the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS) which together constitute a successor to All Our Tomorrows: Inverting the Triangle of Care produced by the Association of Directors of Social Services in 2002. The first document looks at the policy and practice changes that have occurred since All Our Tomorrows, while this document outlines the key areas for future development of policy and practice with regard to older people across public care.

Report that looks at the future development of personalisation at a time of limited resources. It details two seminars held in November 2011, organised by SCIE with support and funding from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF).

The seminars brought together service users, carers and a select number of people involved in practice and policy development around personalisation in adult social care.

Scoping report that explores the implications of implementing key Dilnot and Law Commission proposals in respect of assessment and eligibility for publicly funded adult social care.

It explores the Dilnot Commission‟s recommendations, and those of the Law Commission, for a new model of assessment and a national eligibility threshold for publicly funded adult social care in England. It also discusses the implications for these processes of establishing limited liability for individuals by the proposed capped lifetime contribution of £35,000 for people paying for care.

This paper gives voice to service users’ fears and concerns about risk. It identifies additional risks to those commonly identified by professionals and policy-makers and explores how perceptions of risk and rights are significantly different for mental health service users.

The Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) commissioned this paper as part of its programme on risk, trust and relationships in an ageing society, which aims to explore how risk features in the lives of adults who use care and support.

Paper that updates an earlier extensive review of research into the incidence and management of risk in adult social care in England; and addresses gaps identified in the earlier review, with new studies on the experiences of people with mental health problems or learning disabilities.

This review discusses the measurement of outcome for individuals and their carers for research purposes, particularly the type of research which evaluates the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of social care for adults and which has implications for social care practice. It discusses what is meant by outcome in social care, presenting a model that describes different ‘types’ of outcome and how these are related to one another.

Review that describes the development of research governance arrangements in social care settings over the past decade and examines some of the consequences – both problems and opportunities – created for people who are interested in research: that is, people who undertake research, take part in it, and use it within adult social care settings.

The purpose of this report is to review existing knowledge management and evidence-based practice activities and networks in the North West region and to develop a regional strategy for taking this forward. Time and resources are often wasted because people develop methods over and over again, rather than sharing what they know through reliable local, regional, national and international networks.

Paper that explores the relationship between policy initiatives regarding risk-taking in adult care and its claim to reflect user experience; argues that these policy initiatives are driven by the imperative of rationalising risk management; and claims that such policies are not a response to user demand and that more research is needed to evaluate the attitudes of users of adult care to risk-taking.