social care services

In 2007 Family Rights Group sent a questionnaire to all local authorities in England and Wales, under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 specifically about family and friends care.

It asked each authority to provide its policies for working with, assessing and supporting family and friends carers and the children they are raising, information on dedicated staffing and data on the numbers of children and carers assisted by legal order and budget spent (see Appendix A for the Freedom of Information questions sent to all local authorities in England and Wales).

This briefing on the Health and Social Care Bill has been prepared for the Second Reading debate on the Bill in the House of Commons on 31 January 2011. The Bill is intended to give effect to the reforms requiring primary legislation that were proposed in the NHS White Paper Equity and excellence: Liberating the NHS. This White Paper set out the Government’s aims to reduce central control of the NHS, to engage doctors in the commissioning of health services, and to give patients greater choice. Published in January 2011. Applies to health and social care in England.

The Scottish Care “Manifesto for the future of care and support services for older people in Scotland” has been published. The manifesto is a means to highlight current concerns and outlines proposals for the way forward for care and support services in Scotland.

Over the last decade, Britain’s public services have faced a number of challenges related to a changing population profile, growing demands from more assertive users, and the need for a more sustainable model of delivery. The UK’s huge fiscal deficit will now add the most pressing and complicated challenge of all: cutting expenditure on public services while maintaining quality and user satisfaction.

This research was commissioned by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) and carried out by a team from the Institute for Sustainability, Health and Environment at the University of the West of England, Bristol, between November 2009 and June 2010.

It complements other work undertaken as part of SCIE’s Sustainable Social Care Programme, including the Learning Network run by the Local Government Information Unit (LGiU).

This briefing argues that support given as social care can help improve health and reduce health disadvantage. Improving access to social care interventions is therefore important to any strategy for reducing health inequality. The concept of health inequalities refers to the avoidable health disadvantage people experience as a result of adverse social factors, such as lack of economic or social capital, or marginalisation. People with higher socio-economic position in society have better life chances and more opportunities to flourish. They also have better health.

Social Care TV is a new online channel for anyone involved in the social care sector, ranging from managers and trainers to front-line staff and people who use care services. As part of the SCIE family of resources, Social Care TV brings to life the work and lives of people involved in all aspects of the social care sector, through a series of short films and links to multimedia and e-learning resources. This site offers access to video-based training resources and general interest programmes, reflecting the issues, challenges and rewards in current social care practice.

Multimedia e-learning resources that cover a range of topics, with each topic containing a number of modules. Each module provides audio, video and interactive technology to assist in exploring the topic area.

A one-stop shop for social care practitioners, presenting key findings, current legislation and examples of what is working well to guide and inform practice. Topics include mental health; children, young people and families; disability; fostering; and older people.

Knowledge reviews pull together knowledge from research, practice and people who use services. They describe what knowledge is available, highlight the evidence that has emerged and draw practice points from the evidence. Topics include residential child care, adult mental health services, improving social and health care services, social work education and looked-after children.