social care services

This document was created to assist commissioners in developing commissioning plans that ensure that home care for people with dementia is appropriate to their needs (and/or the needs of their carers).

The Social work Inspection Agency (SWIA) is carrying out performance inspections of all local authority social work services in Scotland. This leaflet summarises some key findings of the inspection of East Ayrshire Council’s social work services, which are set out in the full report published in June 2009.

This progress map summary includes key research findings from a C4EO knowledge review about the diverse needs of different groups of disabled children and their families, and whether services are meeting these needs. The summary includes challenge questions which can be used as tools for strategic leaders in assessing, delivering and monitoring the ways in which the needs of disabled children from differentiated groups are met.

The JIT aims to accelerate the pace of improvements delivered by health and social care partnerships with the objective of achieving service improvements for the benefit of service users and carers.

This research study, commissioned by the Scottish Government Health Directorate, has evaluated the experience and perspectives of those with direct experience of, as well as those working with, the Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 (MHCT Act). A team of independent researchers including 8 mental health service users undertook the study, which lasted 2 years from September 2006.

The importance of meeting the social care needs of cancer patients and their carers is discussed. The article draws on findings of a report from Macmillan Cancer Support.

A Cancer Information and Support Service in County Durham, which is financed by the local PCT and also includes a welfare rights officer employed by the council is also briefly described.

Trusted assessors are support workers who have the skills to provide older and disabled people with equipment to help them to maintain their independence. This document aims to inform professional development and training activity relating to equipment provision. It is divided into four parts.

Evidence-based policy and practice increasingly demands the use of research as a key tool to improve practice. However, little research can be directly applied to practice, many practitioners aren't equipped to digest research and appropriate support systems are lacking. What is needed is a better understanding of the relationship between social care research and the work of social care practitioners, including what organisational structures are needed to enable the use of research.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish. Its aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties. Focusing initially on a cohort of 5,217 children aged 0-1 years old and a cohort of 2,859 children aged 2-3 years old, the first wave of fieldwork began in April 2005.

SCIE, in the formation of its good practice guidance for the social care sector seeks to include all relevant kinds of knowledge and strongly believes that it is only through looking at the sector from a whole perspective - including the views of service users and practitioners - that we can truly advise social care workers on what works best.