social care services

This Act of Scottish Parliament is in four parts. Part 1 covers Community Care, which includes charging and not charging for social care, accommodation, direct payments and carers. Part 2 looks at Joint Working and relationships between NHS bodies and local authorities. Part 3 relates to Health, specifically Health Boards' Lists. Part 4 is a General section outlining regulations, guidance and directions.

A collection of information relating to migrant workers and the Scottish social services sector. The information has been compiled for those in the geographical area covered by the Scottish Social Services Learning Network North but much of the information is relevant Scotland wide.

Consultation on the role of the registered social worker (sometimes referred to as reserved functions). The overarching purpose of the Scottish Government is to focus government and public services on creating a more successful country with opportunities for all of Scotland.

The purpose of this guidance for local authorities is to set out those social work functions which only registered social workers should be accountable for.

The objective of this project was to describe and explain the relationship between age and living standards in later life: exploring how sensitive this relationship is to the questions being asked; and the extent to which the experience of individuals changes as they grow older.

The report is based on analysis of deprivation questions from the Poverty and Social Exclusion survey and the British Household Panel Survey.

This resource is the Act of Scottish Parliament which covers smoking, health and social care. The Act includes sections on the prohibition and control of smoking, dental and eye examinations, pharmaceutical care services as well as the provision of services under NHS contracts.

This report draws on the findings of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation's Governance and Public Services research programme and other related JRF work. It also looks at how citizens are involved, how they influence decisions and how diversity and population change affect citizen and community involvement.

The round-up outlines the challenges and dilemmas that local partners, central government, councillors, staff and communities must resolve if citizens are to have more power and influence over local services and their neighbourhoods.

Good communication, both oral and written, is at the heart of best practice in social work. Communication skills are essential for establishing effective and respectful relationships with service users, and are also essential for assessments, decision making and joint working with colleagues and other professionals.

This resource is for practitioners who work to support or may come into contact with young carers. It is not an assessment tool but a "map" for both families and agencies to follow so they can see what choices, what responsibilities and what lines of accountability for services may be available. When using the "Whole Family Pathway", practitioners should refer to the Key Principles of Practice for supporting young carers and their families.

This research project, commissioned by the Scottish Government, looks at how advocacy for children in the Children's Hearings System compares with arrangements in other UK systems of child welfare and youth justice and those internationally, and what children and young people and the professionals who work with them think about advocacy arrangements in the Children's Hearings System and how these can be improved.

This Review was commissioned on 21 February 2008 by the then Director of Children’s Services (DCS) for Nottingham City Council, where the High Court found that Nottingham Children’s Services had removed a baby from its mother unlawfully. The document provides a summary of events, review findings and recommendations.