social care services

Report that examines the existing level of informal care of older people in Northern Ireland, and the attitudes of people to social care.

This research briefing provides an overview of the evidence concerning the value of supervision in supporting the practice of social care and social work. It is relevant to both children’s and adult social care services and includes a consideration of supervision in integrated, multi-professional teams. While the focus is on social work and social care, some of the research reviewed includes participants from other professions such as nursing and psychology.

Inspection programme in response to the serious abuse and appalling standards of care at Winterbourne View, which was a private hospital for people with learning disabilities. Of the 150 inspections carried out, 145 reports were used for this analysis.

One of three related papers which explore the distinctive contribution which the not-for-profit sector makes to social care. It explores the importance of innovation in the design, delivery and funding of services, andshows how the not-for-profit sector is responding effectively to the need for new approaches to the delivery of social care.

One of three related papers which explore the distinctive contribution which the not-for-profit sector makes to social care. It explores the importance of an effective and committed workforce in delivering good quality care, and shows how the not-for-profit sector is leading the way in developing sustainable policy and best practice.

The Government’s NHS and social care reforms are designed to deliver world class outcomes for patients and users. In social care the success of the reforms will be judged against delivery of improved outcomes in four outcomes domains in the ASCOF:

• Enhancing quality of life for people with care and support needs
• Delaying and reducing the need for care and support
• Ensuring that people have a positive experience of care and support
• Safeguarding adults whose circumstances make them vulnerable and protecting from avoidable harm

Paper that examines the current level of funding of social care and the Dilnot Commission’s recommendations and suggests ways of funding a fairer, more sustainable system of social care.

This briefing updates a previous systematic review by Cameron and Lart that reported on the factors that promote and hinder joint working between health and social care services. Given their prominence in terms of policy debates about joint and integrated working, the briefing focuses on jointly-organised services for older people and people with mental health problems in the UK only. Briefing published by Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in May 2012. Review date is May 2015.

This At a glance briefing discusses the implications of integration for people who use services, practitioners, organisations and researchers. It summarises implications identified in SCIE research briefing 41 Factors that promote and hinder joint and integrated working between health and social care services (Cameron et al, 2012). The research briefing updates a previous systematic review on this topic (Cameron and Lart 2003), and focuses on jointly-organised services for older people and people with mental health problems.