social care provision

On 25 March 2008, the Commissioner for Children and Young People in Scotland laid before the Scottish Parliament a report called Sweet 16? The Age of Leaving Care in Scotland. It was debated on 25 June 2008. The Scottish Government has responded positively to most of the report’s recommendations, which are attached as an appendix to this paper, together with a short summary of the full report.

The authors, from Dorset Council, explain how they are trying to get the best out of the Integrated Children's System despite its limitations. The ICS was intended to enable a single consistent approach to case-based information gathering, case planning, case aggregation and case reviews. As such, the easily generated and clear reports would help social workers collect, organise, analyse and retrieve information.

In June 2008, the Child Poverty Unit held an event entitled ’Ending Child Poverty: “Thinking 2020”’ at which around 100 stakeholders from across lobby organisations, academic institutions, devolved administrations and local and central Government attended. The event was designed to begin a discussion with stakeholders on the vision for a UK free of child poverty by 2020, and the route by which that could be achieved.

The latest Changing Lives Newsletter, produced bi-annually by the Scottish Government. This edition includes articles by Adam Ingram, Minister for Children and Early Years, Alan Baird (President, ADSW), Justin McNicholl (Chair, Local Practitioner Forums). Also, updates on Changing Lives, the Practice Governance Change Group and the User and Carer Forum.

The Social Work Task Force has signalled its intent to come up with a new definition of social work to counter public misconceptions. Anabel Unity Sale reports that with the negative coverage that social work attracts, it is hardly surprising that the public is not clear about what social workers do, and that people are led to believe that professionals swoop in and steal babies from families, give older people with limited mobility a bath and then make their dinner.

This report is the final (Stage 5) report on the work undertaken by Skills for Care & Development as part of their Sector Skills Agreement (SSA) in Scotland. The purpose of this report is to set out the key findings and agreed solutions to the skills gaps identified in the sector as a result of the Sector Skills Agreement process. This agreement is therefore based on the skills demand and provision of supply work already conducted in stages 1 and 2 of the Sector Skills Agreement.

This study used five in depth case studies using documentary analysis, interviews and structured case response methods. The study aimed to consider the impact of the move towards integrated children's service arrangements on how social care services for deaf children and their families are delivered and whether these arrangements create opportunities or threats to identify, assess and meet social care needs. Although good practice was identified, there were concerns about the quality, availability and appropriateness of social care services.

L'Arche is an international federation of communities for people with learning disabilities and assistants. There are eight communities in England, Scotland and Wales. The website provides information about L'Arche communities and their underlying philosophy, information about becoming an assistant, text of L'Arche charter, information on the Overseas Development Fund for sister communities in developing countries, articles written by those involved in the L'Arche Communities, suggestions for further reading, contact details and links to other L'Arche sites.

Report of a study to evaluate the effectiveness of the RSA, a tool to aid Care Commission officers in planning and carrying out their inspection programme by identifying issues and developments which will highlight the required time allotment and intensity of inspection.

This report covers the audits of 16 health bodies in 2007-8. These include all health and social services boards, all health and social care trusts and a number of agencies and special agencies. Health service audit is undertaken by staff from the Northern Ireland Audit Office although a number of audits are contracted out to private sector accountancy firms. The report concludes that the health and social care sector continues to make progress in delivering improved health and social care services.