social care provision

Over the last decade, Britain’s public services have faced a number of challenges related to a changing population profile, growing demands from more assertive users, and the need for a more sustainable model of delivery. The UK’s huge fiscal deficit will now add the most pressing and complicated challenge of all: cutting expenditure on public services while maintaining quality and user satisfaction.

This report explores the complex ethical issues surrounding the commissioning and provision of telecare and the difficult decisions that professionals may face. Some solutions to these difficulties are also discussed. The aim is to ensure that commissioners and providers of telecare address these issues when developing their procedures and protocols.

Recorded as part of the IRISS Masterclass Series workshops, this podcast details what next practice can offer to people using social services. Geoff Mulgan focuses on two main areas - productivity in the workplace and tools for innovation.

In this learning object you will have an opportunity to learn about the principal services available for older people at the primary, mainstream, secondary/specialist and tertiary levels by travelling down a virtual 'care pathway'. Along the way you will have the chance to test your knowledge of relevant statistics and will examine cross cutting issues and assessment. This object also contains a self-assessment section where you can test how far you have assimilated the key messages from this learning object.

One of a series of six transforming community service best practice guides for frontline staff and their leaders which aims to help to deliver High Quality Care for all: the Next Sate Review. Each guide has a similar framework, clearly setting out ambitions, taking action to deliver, using best available evidence and demonstrating and measuring achievement. The guides also highlight what is considered to be good practice across community services.

This document sets out a new framework for local partnerships on alcohol and drugs. It aims to ensure that all bodies involved in tackling alcohol and drugs problems are clear about their responsibilities and their relationships with each other; and to focus activity on the identification, pursuit and achievement of agreed, shared outcomes.

This is the report of the Alcohol and Drugs Delivery Reform Group. In January 2008 the Delivery Reform Group to improve alcohol and drug delivery arrangements and ensure better outcomes for service users was established by the Scottish Government. Members were invited from the Scottish Advisory Committee on Drug Misuse (SACDM) and the Scottish Ministerial Advisory Committee on Alcohol Problems (SMACAP).

The report focuses on how to involve older people alongside the professionals, as equals, in identifying what services they want and value. It notes that older people are able to take account of costs of service provision in an environment where resources are limited, and with this information they are able to prioritise the service provision which they require.

Midlothian Council social work division performed to an adequate standard in delivering positive outcomes for people who used services. The performance was good in relation to service users who had mental health problems, throughcare and aftercare services for care leavers and educational attainment of looked after children.

This report is not a detailed description of all the social work services in Midlothian. It gives an overview and concentrates on the work being undertaken with people who need assistance and the areas where improvements are needed.