social care provision

Freedom of information survey of local authority policies on family and friends care

In 2007 Family Rights Group sent a questionnaire to all local authorities in England and Wales, under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 specifically about family and friends care.

It asked each authority to provide its policies for working with, assessing and supporting family and friends carers and the children they are raising, information on dedicated staffing and data on the numbers of children and carers assisted by legal order and budget spent (see Appendix A for the Freedom of Information questions sent to all local authorities in England and Wales).

Integrating health and social care budgets

Over the last decade, Britain’s public services have faced a number of challenges related to a changing population profile, growing demands from more assertive users, and the need for a more sustainable model of delivery. The UK’s huge fiscal deficit will now add the most pressing and complicated challenge of all: cutting expenditure on public services while maintaining quality and user satisfaction.

Ethical issues in the use of telecare

This report explores the complex ethical issues surrounding the commissioning and provision of telecare and the difficult decisions that professionals may face. Some solutions to these difficulties are also discussed. The aim is to ensure that commissioners and providers of telecare address these issues when developing their procedures and protocols.

Next Practice

Recorded as part of the IRISS Masterclass Series workshops, this podcast details what next practice can offer to people using social services. Geoff Mulgan focuses on two main areas - productivity in the workplace and tools for innovation.

The report of the Older People's Inquiry into 'That Bit of Help'

The report focuses on how to involve older people alongside the professionals, as equals, in identifying what services they want and value. It notes that older people are able to take account of costs of service provision in an environment where resources are limited, and with this information they are able to prioritise the service provision which they require.

Care and support - a community responsibility? (summary report)

Any new settlement on long-term care and support must address the apportionment of responsibility for its delivery as well as its funding. With the state's capacity limited and family input likely to decline, the wider community must expect to play a growing role. This offers an opportunity to end social care's marginalisation, argues David Brindle.

Supporting disabled adults as parents

Effective support for disabled parents is still rare, though many local authorities are beginning to recognise its importance. The National Family and Parenting Institute researched how supportive practice could be improved by talking to disabled parents and visiting four local authorities that are developing work in this area.

Growing up in social housing in Britain: A profile of four generations from 1946 to the present day

A look at the role of social housing for four generations of families since the Second World War. This study describes how housing for families has changed over time and explores the relationship between social housing, family circumstances and the 'adult outcomes' for children who grew up in social housing – i.e. their experiences when they are adults.

Contracting for personalised outcomes: learning from emerging practice

This report draws on the learning from six councils and shows how they have begun to change their approach to contracting, service development and provider relationships to be more compatible with the aims of personalisation and personal budgets. It provides a summary of the main components of the contractual models identified (personal budgets, service personalisation and outcomes focused framework contracts), a framework for understanding the relationship between them and a brief account of the key messages from the case studies.

Transforming the quality of dementia care: Consultation on a national dementia strategy

The Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) is pleased to submit the following response to the Department of Health’s consultation on a national dementia strategy. This submission is structured to answer, in order, the questions set by the consultation paper, Transforming the quality of dementia care: Consultation on a national dementia strategy.

The final section covers some areas not directly mentioned in the paper that the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) thinks warrant the government’s consideration in relation to a national dementia strategy.