respite care

A review of respite / short break provision for adult carers of adults in the Highland Partnership area

As part of the implementation of the Equal Partners in Care (EPiC) Highland Carer’s Strategy 2014-2017 it was agreed to undertake a review of respite for Adult Carers of Adults (aged 16+). Independent consultants were commissioned by NHS Highland through Connecting Carers to undertake this work.
There are four groups of people – totalling an estimated 200 people - with whom conversations have taken place during the review:
Carers and staff from carer support organisations – more than 75 carers have given their views;

The cost of short break services: understanding the contracting and commissioning process

The aim of the research was to explore the costs of short break services for disabled children and their families. The study also sought to understand the contracting and commissioning process, including the factors that inform decision making processes and the management of budgets.

The research was commissioned by Action for Children and carried out by the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University.

Short Break (Respite Care) Provision in Dundee – now and in the future

Executive Summary
Dundee Carers Centre commissioned Animate to carry out research into the current and future provision of Short Breaks/Respite for adults in Dundee, on behalf of the Dundee Partnership. The main purpose of the research was to help local service planners improve Short Break provision in line with the overall principles of the Scottish Government’s policy intentions: protecting young carers, enabling self - care and working with adult carers as partners in care, by:
• improving planning of Short Break services

Third national personal budget survey

Personal budgets are now a core part of social care and will be an increasingly significant part of the future of healthcare and education for many. We have moved on from their introduction in the Putting People First concordat in 2007 with an expectation that 30% of people would be using them by 2011 – to the Care Act requirement that all eligible people should hold one.

This research is from England carried out by In-Control to evidence the impact of personal budgets on those who use them and services.

Creative Breaks 2012-13: Evaluation of Time to Live projects

The Time to Live strand is part of the Creative Breaks programme and awards grants directly to individual carers so that they can arrange and pay for the short break that suits them best. In 2011 the Time to Live strand was piloted with 12 organisations who offer support to carers based upon geographical boundaries. In 2012 the application was extended to include organisations with a national, condition specific focus. This evaluation examines the projects running from October 2012 through to September 2013.

Future care - the case for care leave: families, work and the ageing population

Research that shows that the UK is falling far behind other countries regarding care leave, many of which are finding creative solutions to support their workforce and address the challenges of ageing populations.

It argues that if the UK is to cope with the critical demographic challenge it faces and reap the social and economic benefits of helping carers to juggle work and care then more must be done.

Better Breaks: Round 1 evaluation

The Better Breaks programme awarded its first grants in March 2012. 51 grants, totalling £1,121,602 were distributed to projects across Scotland so that these projects could deliver quality short breaks for children and young people with disabilities which would be tailored to their needs whilst giving their families a break from caring.
The evaluation was based on information provided by the funded projects through their applications, their End of Grant reports, any supporting materials provided, selected telephone calls and review of the Shared Stories films.

It always comes down to money. Recent changes in service provision to disabled children, young people and their families in Scotland

Services for disabled youngsters and their families have declined significantly across Scotland as the impact of public sector cuts is felt, according to a new report produced for Scotland’s Commissioner for Children & Young People.

It Always Comes Down to Money examines changes in the availability and accessibility of publicly-funded services for families with disabled children over the past two years.